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I want to capture the Ctrl+C (SIGINT) signal sent from the console and print out some partial run totals.

Is this possible in Golang?

Note: When I first posted the question I was confused about Ctrl-C being SIGTERM instead of SIGINT.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 76 down vote accepted

You can use the os/signal package to handle incoming signals. ^C is SIGINT, so you can use this to trap os.Interrupt.

c := make(chan os.Signal, 1)
signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt)
go func(){
    for sig := range c {
        // sig is a ^C, handle it
    }
}()

The manner in which you cause your program to terminate and print information is entirely up to you.

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Thanks! So... ^C it's not SIGTERM, then? UPDATE: Sorry, the link you provided is detailed enough! –  Sebastián Grignoli Jun 29 '12 at 21:51
7  
Instead of for sig := range g {, you can also use <-sigchan as in this previous answer : stackoverflow.com/questions/8403862/… –  dystroy Jun 30 '12 at 7:34
3  
@dystroy: Sure, if you're actually going to terminate the program in response to the first signal. By using the loop you can catch all the signals if you happen to decide not to terminate the program. –  Kevin Ballard Jun 30 '12 at 21:31
14  
Note: you must actually build the program for this to work. If you run the program via go run in a console and send a SIGTERM via ^C, the signal is written into the channel and the program responds, but appears to drop out of the loop unexpectedly. This is because the SIGRERM goes to go run as well! (This has cause me substantial confusion!) –  William Pursell Nov 17 '12 at 22:33
3  
Note that in order for the goroutine to get processor time to handle the signal, the main goroutine must call a blocking operation or call runtime.Gosched in an appropriate place (in your program's main loop, if it has one) –  misterbee Aug 4 '13 at 15:53

All of the above seem to work when spliced in, but gobyexample's signals page has a really clean and complete example of signal capturing. Worth adding to this list.

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To add slightly to the other answers, if you actually want to catch SIGTERM (the default signal sent by the kill command), you can use syscall.SIGTERM in place of os.Interrupt. Beware that the syscall interface is system-specific and might not work everywhere (e.g. on windows). But it works nicely to catch both:

c := make(chan os.Signal, 2)
signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt, syscall.SIGTERM)
....
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2  
The signal.Notify function allows to specify several signals at once. Thus, you can simplify your code to signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt, syscall.SIGTERM). –  jochen Aug 25 '13 at 13:31
    
I think I found that out after posting. Fixed! –  adamonduty Aug 25 '13 at 19:55

This works:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "os/signal"
    "syscall"
    "time" // or "runtime"
)

func cleanup() {
    fmt.Println("cleanup")
}

func main() {
    c := make(chan os.Signal, 1)
    signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt)
    signal.Notify(c, syscall.SIGTERM)
    go func() {
        <-c
        cleanup()
        os.Exit(1)
    }()

    for {
        fmt.Println("sleeping...")
        time.Sleep(10 * time.Second) // or runtime.Gosched() or similar per @misterbee
    }
}
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+1 for using channels' syntax –  Francesco Noferi Oct 6 '14 at 10:34

There were (at time of posting) one or two little typos in the accepted answer above, so here's the cleaned up version. In this example I'm stopping the CPU profiler when receiving Ctrl+C.

// capture ctrl+c and stop CPU profiler                            
c := make(chan os.Signal, 1)                                       
signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt)                                     
go func() {                                                        
  for sig := range c {                                             
    log.Printf("captured %v, stopping profiler and exiting..", sig)
    pprof.StopCPUProfile()                                         
    os.Exit(1)                                                     
  }                                                                
}()    
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1  
Note that in order for the goroutine to get processor time to handle the signal, the main goroutine must call a blocking operation or call runtime.Gosched in an appropriate place (in your program's main loop, if it has one) –  misterbee Aug 4 '13 at 15:54

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