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On www.dofactory.com I found a real world example of the Factory Pattern. But the code generates a warning in ReSharper about a virtual member call in the constructor.

The code causing the warning is the following:

abstract class Document
{
    private List<Page> _pages = new List<Page>();

    // Constructor calls abstract Factory method
    public Document()
    {
        this.CreatePages(); // <= this line is causing the warning
    }

    public List<Page> Pages
    {
        get { return _pages; }
    }

    // Factory Method
    public abstract void CreatePages();
}

class Resume : Document
{
    // Factory Method implementation
    public override void CreatePages()
    {
        Pages.Add(new SkillsPage());
        Pages.Add(new EducationPage());
        Pages.Add(new ExperiencePage());
    }
}

In the consuming code, you can then simply use:

Document document = new Resume();

I do understand why it's a bad idea to call a virtual member in the constructor (as explained here).

My question is how you can refactor this in order to still use the factory pattern, but without the virtual member call in the constructor.

If I'd just remove the call to CreatePages from the constructor, the consumer would have to explicitly call the CreatePages method:

Document document = new Resume();
document.CreatePages();

I much more prefer the situation where creating a new Resume is all that's needed to actually create a Resume containing pages.

share|improve this question
    
Just mark Resume as sealed ? –  EkoostikMartin Jun 29 '12 at 21:19
1  
@EkoostikMartin what if the OP will wake up tomorrow wanting to declare StylishResume : Resume? –  s.m. Jun 29 '12 at 21:21
    
@EkoostikMartin: I don't just want the warning to go away, I want to know how else this could be implemented. Still making it possible to subclass Resume. –  comecme Jun 29 '12 at 21:39
    
I would recommend looking for better real world examples. –  Don Roby Jun 29 '12 at 22:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way to refactor this would be passing the pages upfront, and passing them to a protected constructor:

public abstract class Document {
    protected Document(IEnumerable<Page> pages) {
        // If it's OK to add to _pages, do not use AsReadOnly
        _pages = pages.ToList().AsReadOnly();
    }
    // ...
}

public class Resume : Document {
    public Resume() : base(CreatePages()) {
    }
    private static IEnumerable<Page> CreatePages() {
        return new Page[] {
            new SkillsPage(),
            new EducationPage(),
            new ExperiencePage()
        };
    }
}

P.S. I am not sure what this has to do with the factory method. Your post illustrates the Template Method Pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
According to dofactory.com it is an example of a factory method. Are they wrong? –  comecme Jun 29 '12 at 21:37
2  
@comecme Yes, I am reasonably certain that they are wrong: for one thing, factory method cannot be void, it has to return something. –  dasblinkenlight Jun 29 '12 at 21:47

You can do in property itself.

In that case the Pages property can be marked as virtual in base class.

The hypothetic code for Resume could look like this:

    private List<Page> _pages  = null;
    public override List<Page> Pages
    {
          get 
          {  
                if(pages == null) 
                {
                  _pages = new List<Page>();
                  _pages .Add(new SkillsPage());
                  _pages .Add(new EducationPage());
                  _pages .Add(new ExperiencePage());
                }

                return _pages; 
           }

        }
    }

In this case, the pages will be created on first access to Pages property, and not on ctor execution.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this would qualify as a factory method, since there is no method anymore. –  comecme Jun 29 '12 at 21:36
    
Well, you use a property like a "method". Why you want toughly couple with method members... –  Tigran Jun 29 '12 at 21:41

What about this? It uses lazy initialization where the pages are created only when needed (instead of creating them in the constructor)

Also, note the factory method visibility is changed to protected to hide it from public usage.

abstract class Document{
    protected List<Page> _pages = new List<Page>();

    // Constructor calls abstract Factory method
    public Document(){}

    public List<Page> Pages
    {
        get { CreatePages(); return _pages; }
    }

    // Factory Method
    protected abstract void CreatePages();
}

class Resume : Document{
    // Factory Method implementation
    protected override void CreatePages(){
       if(pages.Count == 0 ){
        _pages .Add(new SkillsPage());
        _pages .Add(new EducationPage());
        _pages .Add(new ExperiencePage());
       }
    }
}

EDIT Suggestion: I personally do not like having that global _pages variable as it might get you into trouble if shared among many methods and threads. I would rather go for the factory method pattern as described in the GoF book. Here is my suggestion:

abstract class Document{
    public IEnumerable<Page> Pages{
        get { return CreatePages();}
    }

    // Factory Method
    protected abstract IEnumerable<Page> CreatePages();
}

class Resume : Document{
    // Factory Method implementation
    protected override IEnumerable<Page> CreatePages(){
         List<Page> _pages = new List<Page>();
        _pages .Add(new SkillsPage());
        _pages .Add(new EducationPage());
        _pages .Add(new ExperiencePage());
        return _pages;
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would keep adding pages on each access of Pages. I suppose inside the Pages property you would check if _pages == null and only call CreatePages if it is. –  comecme Jun 29 '12 at 21:32
    
@comecme Just updated my code :) it should be fine now –  GETah Jun 29 '12 at 21:33
1  
Your code doesnt make sense, CreatePages() has a void return, so what does myResume.Pages give me in this design? –  EkoostikMartin Jun 29 '12 at 21:33
    
@EkoostikMartin Yeah I just saw that! Fixed now. Thanks for the tip –  GETah Jun 29 '12 at 21:34
    
I'd prefer the check for _pages == null or _pages.Count == 0 to be inside the abstract class though. –  comecme Jun 29 '12 at 21:34

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