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I am going a bit nuts trying to figure out why the following won't compile:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <boost/variant.hpp>
#include <forward_list>

typedef unsigned long long very_long;
typedef boost::variant< int, std::string > variants_type;
typedef std::array< variants_type, 5 > row_type;
typedef std::forward_list<row_type> rows_holder_type;

int main() {

    rows_holder_type rows;
    row_type row_data;

    row_data[0] = 0;
    row_data[1] = 0;
    row_data[2] = 0;
    row_data[3] = 0;
    row_data[4] = 0;

    rows.push_front(row_data);
}

This is the compiler error I am getting:

/usr/include/testing/test_code.o||In function 'std::array<boost::variant<int, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_>, 5ul>::array(std::array<boost::variant<int, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_>, 5ul> const&)':|
store.cpp:(.text._ZNSt5arrayIN5boost7variantIiSsNS0_6detail7variant5void_ES4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_EELm5EEC2ERKS6_[_ZNSt5arrayIN5boost7variantIiSsNS0_6detail7variant5void_ES4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_S4_EELm5EEC5ERKS6_]+0x31)||undefined reference to 'boost::variant<int, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_>::variant(boost::variant<int, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_, boost::detail::variant::void_> const&)'|
||=== Build finished: 1 errors, 0 warnings ===|

If I replace:

typedef boost::variant< int, std::string > variants_type;

with:

typedef boost::any variants_type;

The code compiles, but I do not want to use boost::any for performance reasons.

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4  
It does compile, that is a linker error. –  hmjd Jun 29 '12 at 21:31
    
Any suggestion on how to fix it? I'm googling how to fix linker errors as we speak, but have yet to run into the solution. –  user396404 Jun 29 '12 at 21:43
    
'fraid not. I have never used boost::variant. A lot of the boost stuff is header only, so no need to link anything, but not everything. The boost::regex is an example of that, which you need to build a library and then link with it. –  hmjd Jun 29 '12 at 21:46
1  
I guess the linker error is because boost::variant is not a 'complete-type' and std::array (like most of the standard library headers) requires complete types. –  Aditya Kumar Jun 29 '12 at 22:58
1  
@Aditya : How could boost::variant<> not be a complete type here? –  ildjarn Jun 30 '12 at 0:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I tested your code with MSVC and gcc 4.7.0. MSVC compiles and links the code fine (of course with #include <string>), but gcc gives a linker error on the last line rows.push_front(row_data);. If you comment that line out, gcc accepts the code. I see no reason why gcc gives a linker error and am concluding that it is a bug with gcc. One workaround on gcc would be to change std::array to std::vector.

(From the error message I assume you are using Code::Blocks with gcc)

I've eliminated extra code and the following example still gives the linker error:

#include <boost/variant.hpp>
#include <array>

int main()
{
    std::array<boost::variant<int, double>, 5> row_type1;
    std::array<boost::variant<int, double>, 5> row_type2 = row_type1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, bizarre... –  ildjarn Jun 29 '12 at 22:43
    
This really is bizarre. I could have sworn I've used something like this with arrays before. For now, your vector "fix" is working. –  user396404 Jun 30 '12 at 20:18
    
Clang 3.1 has no issues producing linkable output. –  Managu Jul 1 '12 at 0:10
    
I am going to mark this as the correct answer because it did "fix" the compile error. However, I still think there has to be some way to work around this. –  user396404 Jul 2 '12 at 3:45
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You're missing #include <string>; other than that your code is fine.

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