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I want to find all foreign keys in a table, and for each foreign key find the primary key table & column it points to. I need to do this using INFORMATION_SCHEMA because we want to use this against all DB vendors (or at least all that properly implement INFORMATION_SCHEMA).

The best I have come up with is:

"SELECT k.COLUMN_NAME, ccu.TABLE_NAME AS 'references_table', ccu.COLUMN_NAME AS 'references_field' " +
"FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE AS k LEFT OUTER JOIN " +
"INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS AS c ON k.TABLE_NAME = c.TABLE_NAME AND k.TABLE_SCHEMA = c.TABLE_SCHEMA AND " +
"k.TABLE_CATALOG = c.TABLE_CATALOG AND k.CONSTRAINT_CATALOG = c.CONSTRAINT_CATALOG AND " +
"k.CONSTRAINT_NAME = c.CONSTRAINT_NAME LEFT OUTER JOIN " +
"INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS AS rc ON rc.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = c.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA AND " +
"rc.CONSTRAINT_CATALOG = c.CONSTRAINT_CATALOG AND rc.CONSTRAINT_NAME = c.CONSTRAINT_NAME LEFT OUTER JOIN " +
"INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE AS ccu ON rc.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = ccu.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA AND " +
"rc.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_CATALOG = ccu.CONSTRAINT_CATALOG AND rc.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = ccu.CONSTRAINT_NAME " +
"WHERE(k.CONSTRAINT_CATALOG = DB_NAME()) AND (k.TABLE_NAME = '" + table.Name + "') AND (c.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY')";

This strikes me as over-complicated. Is there a better select for this?

thanks - dave

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Do you know fore sure that each pk/fk relationship is being enforced in the database? –  TexasTubbs Jun 30 '12 at 3:05
    
@TexasTubbs - possibly not. But we can make use of the ones that are in the metadata and usually that is all of them. –  David Thielen Jun 30 '12 at 17:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT  ccu1.TABLE_NAME as fkTable, ccu1.COLUMN_NAME as fkColumn, 
        ccu2.TABLE_NAME as referencedTable, ccu2.COLUMN_NAME as referencedColumn
FROM    INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE ccu1,
        INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE ccu2,
        INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS rc
WHERE   rc.CONSTRAINT_NAME = ccu1.CONSTRAINT_NAME
AND     rc.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = ccu2.CONSTRAINT_NAME

I tested this against a SQL Server 2008 database and when run under context of my user database, it returned all my defined tables with foreign keys, and the related table and column.

You can also filter this down further of course.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, that works. One correction though, it needs to be ccu1.COLUMN_NAME as fkColumn. This is a lot simpler and clearer. And very clever how you access the same table two different ways. –  David Thielen Jun 30 '12 at 17:48
    
Good catch I think I picked the wrong column name with intellisense. I edited it. –  Jim Jun 30 '12 at 23:02
    
Now if only all the SQL vendors would fully and correctly implement the standard INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables... –  David Thielen Jun 30 '12 at 23:31
    
If you're using Java / JDBC, you can just get a metadata object, and any JDBC compliant driver takes care of gathering the metadata and making sure it contains correct info. That's what I would suggest. –  Jim Jul 1 '12 at 15:19
    
Yep. Unfortunately we need this in .NET. –  David Thielen Jul 1 '12 at 15:27

The originally accepted answer does not properly take into account a database using composite primary keys.

Try this instead:

select  fku.CONSTRAINT_NAME, fku.ORDINAL_POSITION
        , fku.TABLE_SCHEMA as FK_TABLE_SCHEMA
        , fku.TABLE_NAME as FK_TABLE_NAME
        , fku.COLUMN_NAME as FK_COLUMN_NAME
        , pku.TABLE_SCHEMA as PK_TABLE_SCHEMA
        , pku.TABLE_NAME as PK_TABLE_NAME
        , pku.COLUMN_NAME as PK_COLUMN_NAME

from    INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS rc
        INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE pku
            ON rc.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = pku.CONSTRAINT_NAME
        INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE fku
            ON rc.CONSTRAINT_NAME = fku.CONSTRAINT_NAME AND pku.ORDINAL_POSITION = fku.ORDINAL_POSITION
order by fku.TABLE_SCHEMA, fku.TABLE_NAME, fku.ORDINAL_POSITION
share|improve this answer

Jim's answer fails to correctly return all the foreign keys if the referred table (the table that the foreign key is looking against) has a unique key because it uses the UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME column. I suggest using:

SELECT 
    FK = fk.name, 
    FKTable = QUOTENAME(OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(fkcol.[object_id])) 
        + '.' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_NAME(fkcol.[object_id])),
    FKCol = fkcol.name,
    ' references => ',
    PKTable = QUOTENAME(OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(pkcol.[object_id])) 
        + '.' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_NAME(pkcol.[object_id])),
    PKCol = pkcol.name
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS fk
INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns AS fkc
ON fk.[object_id] = fkc.constraint_object_id
INNER JOIN sys.columns AS fkcol
ON fkc.parent_object_id = fkcol.[object_id]
AND fkc.parent_column_id = fkcol.column_id
INNER JOIN sys.columns AS pkcol
ON fkc.referenced_object_id = pkcol.[object_id]
AND fkc.referenced_column_id = pkcol.column_id
ORDER BY fkc.constraint_column_id;

Source: http://sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2011/11/03/the-case-against-information-schema-views.aspx

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