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I'm using eSpeak on Ubuntu and have a Python 2.7 script that prints and speaks a message:

import subprocess
text = 'Hello World.'
print text
subprocess.call(['espeak', text])

eSpeak produces the desired sounds, but clutters the shell with some errors (ALSA lib..., no socket connect) so i cannot easily read what was printed earlier. Exit code is 0.

Unfortunately there is no documented option to turn off its verbosity, so I'm looking for a way to only visually silence it and keep the open shell clean for further interaction.

How can I do this?

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could you not just call with os.system then? not ideal but shouldnt print i dont think –  Joran Beasley Jun 29 '12 at 22:12
    
@JoranBeasley: os.system() will print to the console unless you redirect the shell command –  jdi Jun 29 '12 at 22:16
    
no, os.system('espeak '+ text) reproduces this behavior. –  ferkulat Jun 29 '12 at 22:17
    
@ferkulat: I updated my answer to also show the os.system syntax. Though it is just for illustration. Stick with subprocess –  jdi Jun 29 '12 at 22:19
    
good correction ... your right ... for some reason i remembered incorrectly thinking that os.system didnt print ... –  Joran Beasley Jun 29 '12 at 22:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 69 down vote accepted

Redirect the output to DEVNULL:

import os
import subprocess

FNULL = open(os.devnull, 'w')
retcode = subprocess.call(['echo', 'foo'], stdout=FNULL, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)

It is effectively the same as running this shell command:

retcode = os.system("echo 'foo' &> /dev/null")
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redirecting dev/null works fine, no cluttered shell. –  ferkulat Jun 29 '12 at 22:26
7  
micro neat picks: you could use os.devnull if subprocess.DEVNULL is not available (<3.3), use check_call() instead of call() if you don't check its returned code, open files in binary mode for stdin/stdout/stderr, usage of os.system() should be discouraged, &> doesn't work for sh on Ubuntu an explicit >/dev/null 2>&1 could be used. –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 30 '12 at 1:02
    
@J.F.Sebastian: Thanks for the suggestions. I actually meant to use os.devnull but accidentally typed it out. Also, I am sticking with the OPs use of call since they are not catching the possible exception check_call would raise. And for the os.system redirect, it was more just an illustration of what the effective use of the subprocess approach is doing. Not really as a second suggestion. –  jdi Jun 30 '12 at 1:13
1  
Don't you need to close the FNULL that you have opened? –  Val Nov 11 '13 at 12:47
    
@Val: probably. –  jdi Nov 11 '13 at 19:09

Here's a more portable version (just for fun, it is not necessary in your case):

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from subprocess import Popen, PIPE, STDOUT

try:
    from subprocess import DEVNULL # py3k
except ImportError:
    import os
    DEVNULL = open(os.devnull, 'wb')

text = u"René Descartes"
p = Popen(['espeak', '-b', '1'], stdin=PIPE, stdout=DEVNULL, stderr=STDOUT)
p.communicate(text.encode('utf-8'))
assert p.returncode == 0 # use appropriate for your program error handling here
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Why not use commands.getoutput() instead?

import commands

text = "Mario Balotelli" 
output = 'espeak "%s"' % text
print text
a = commands.getoutput(output)
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a) it doesn't discard input, it accumulates it in memory unnecessarily b) it breaks if text has quotes in it, or uses a different character encoding, or too large for a command line c) it is Unix only (on Python 2) –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 9 at 10:56

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