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Can anyone advise on a simple way of converting a csv string to an array of floats in C?

e.g.

char my_string[] = "1.0,2.0,3.0";

to:

my_array = [1.0, 2.0, 3.0]

where my_array is of type float[]

I would use sscanf as a quick and easy solution but I don't know how many values are contained in the string in advance

Is there some existing library function that could do this without me having to resort to looping over every char looking for a ","?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use strtok():

float my_array[N]; // if you don't know how many there are, use the heap
int i = 0;

char *tok = strtok(my_string, ",");
while (tok != NULL) {
    my_array[i++] = atof(tok);
    tok = strtok(NULL, ",");
}   
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3  
...if you don't mind the fact that strtok() splatters nulls into the middle of your string... –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 29 '12 at 22:46
    
Indeed, only use this if you don't care about the original string (say, maybe you got it from reading a file and it's temporary, and all you care about are the floats). –  rid Jun 29 '12 at 22:55

There's a library you could use - LibCSV

From their description:

libcsv is a small, simple and fast CSV library written in pure ANSI C89 that can read and write CSV data. It provides a straight-forward interface using callback functions to handle parsed fields and rows and can parse improperly formatted CSV files

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Use a while() loop that reads only one float at a time with sscanf(). As soon as sscanf() returns 0, you know you're at the end of the list.

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how do you get sscanf to advance along the string, i.e. move forward through each csv? –  bph Jun 29 '12 at 23:04
    
Sorry, didn't think about that. Only works as expected with scanf, fscanf.. –  ypnos Jun 29 '12 at 23:28
1  
You use the %n conversion specifier to find the number of characters read. You have to be a bit careful; which side of the comma does it go? Or do you handle the commas outside the sscanf()? Probably the latter. So: size_t offset = 0; int position; while (sscanf(buffer + offset, "%lf%n", &my_array[i], &position) == 1) { offset += position; if (buffer[offset] == ',') position++; } would be an approximation to what's needed. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 29 '12 at 23:41
1  
What @JonathanLeffler said, with the addition that i needs to be incremented, and should be checked to to ensure it doesn't buffer overflow my_array. –  Brian Swift Jun 30 '12 at 1:54
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char** split(const char *str, const char *delimiter, size_t *len){
    char *text, *p, *first, **array;
    int c;
    char** ret;

    *len = 0;
    text=strdup(str);
    if(text==NULL) return NULL;
    for(c=0,p=text;NULL!=(p=strtok(p, delimiter));p=NULL, c++)//count item
        if(c==0) first=p; //first token top

    ret=(char**)malloc(sizeof(char*)*c+1);//+1 for NULL
    if(ret==NULL){
        free(text);
        return NULL;
    }
    strcpy(text, str+(first-text));//skip until top token
    array=ret;

    for(p=text;NULL!=(p=strtok(p, delimiter));p=NULL){
        *array++=strdup(p);
    }
    *array=NULL;
    *len=c;
    free(text);
    return ret;
}

void free4split(char** sa){
    char **array=sa;

    if(sa!=NULL){
        while(*sa)
            free(*sa++);//for string
        free(array);    //for array
    }
}

int main(){
    char my_string[] = "1.0,2.0,3.0";
    float *my_array;
    char **strs;
    size_t count;

    strs=split(my_string, ", \t", &count);
    my_array=(float*)malloc(sizeof(float)*count);
    {   //convert
        int i;
        for(i=0;i<count;++i)
            my_array[i]=(float)atof(strs[i]);
        free4split(strs);

    }
    {   //test print
        int i;
        for(i=0;i<count;++i)
            printf("%f\n", my_array[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}
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thanks for the response but this is the sort of C craziness I'm trying to avoid - was hoping there would be a simple one or two liner that someone knew of –  bph Jun 30 '12 at 12:06
1  
@Hiett - one-liners function like you seek is not present in the standard library of the language C. –  BLUEPIXY Jun 30 '12 at 12:59
    
The split should use strtok_r –  BLUEPIXY Jun 30 '12 at 13:09
    
@Hiett: I think you won't find a "simple" two liner that will solve this problem in 'C'. You'll need to use something like what Radu suggested, use a library such as LibCSV or use a different language. –  Chimera Jun 30 '12 at 20:42
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char* getToken(char **p, const char delimiter){
    char *word, *top=*p;
    int len;

    if(*p == NULL || **p == '\0') return NULL;
    while(**p && **p != delimiter)
        ++(*p);
    if(**p != delimiter) return strdup(top);
    len = *p - top;
    ++(*p);
    word=(char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*(len+1));
    strncpy(word, top, len);
    word[len]='\0';
    return word;
}

int main(){
    char my_string[] = "1.0,2.0,3.0";
    float *my_array=NULL;
    char *word, *p=my_string;
    int count=0;

    while(NULL!=(word=getToken(&p, ','))){
        my_array=(float*)realloc(my_array, sizeof(float)*(++count));
        my_array[count-1]=(float)atof(word);
        free(word);
    }
    {   //test print
        int i;
        for(i=0;i<count;++i)
            printf("%f\n", my_array[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}
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You might want to look into using the strchr family of functions.

STRCHR(3)           Linux Programmer's Manual           STRCHR(3)

NAME
       strchr, strrchr - locate character in string

SYNOPSIS
       #include <string.h>

       char *strchr(const char *s, int c);

       char *strrchr(const char *s, int c);

DESCRIPTION
       The  strchr()  function  returns  a  pointer  to the first
       occurrence of the character c in the string s.

       The strrchr() function  returns  a  pointer  to  the  last
       occurrence of the character c in the string s.

RETURN VALUE
       The  strchr()  and strrchr() functions return a pointer to
       the matched character or NULL  if  the  character  is  not
       found.

CONFORMING TO
       SVID 3, POSIX, BSD 4.3, ISO 9899

SEE ALSO
       index(3),  memchr(3),  rindex(3),  strpbrk(3),  strsep(3),
       strspn(3), strstr(3), strtok(3)
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