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I want to invoke the method by the method name stored in the list. Can anyone help? I'm new to c#!

{
   delegate string ConvertsIntToString(int i);
}

class Program
{
    public static List<String> states = new List<string>() { "dfd","HiThere"};
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ConvertsIntToString someMethod = new ConvertsIntToString(states[1]);
        string message = someMethod(5);
        Console.WriteLine(message);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
    private static string HiThere(int i)
    {
        return "Hi there! #" + (i * 100);
    }
 }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like you don't need Delegate.DynamicInvoke at all - you're not trying to invoke it dynamically - you're trying to create the delegate dynamically, which you can do with Delegate.CreateDelegate. Short but complete program based around your example (but without using a list - there's no need for that here):

using System;
using System.Reflection;

delegate string ConvertsIntToString(int i);

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Obviously this can come from elsewhere
        string name = "HiThere";

        var method = typeof(Program).GetMethod(name, 
                                               BindingFlags.Static | 
                                               BindingFlags.NonPublic);
        var del = (ConvertsIntToString) Delegate.CreateDelegate
            (typeof(ConvertsIntToString), method);

        string result = del(5);
        Console.WriteLine(result);
    }

    private static string HiThere(int i)
    {
        return "Hi there! #" + (i * 100);
    }
 }

Obviously you need to adjust it if the method you want is in a different type, or is an instance method, or is public.

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why should he create a delegate when he can just invoke it directly? –  Clueless Jun 29 '12 at 23:22
    
@Clueless: We don't know, but there are plenty of reasons he might want to. For example, if he's invoking it several times, it's much more efficient to create a delegate once than to invoke using reflection many times. Alternatively, maybe he wants to pass it to a method which accepts a delegate. –  Jon Skeet Jun 30 '12 at 6:14

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