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I have some simple JQuery / Javascript to perform some simple logic for all external hyperlinks:

<script>
    $("a[href^='http://']:not([href*='"+location.hostname+"']),[href^='https://']:not([href*='"+location.hostname+"'])")
    .addClass("external")
    .attr("target","_blank")
    .attr("title","Opens new window").click(function(e) {alert('You are leaving mysite and going somewhere else, you crazy dude')});
</script>

This is fine for one page. However, I wish to have this in every web page in my application and be 100% sure that it is there.

Is there any good trick to do this?

The only one I can think of is if you are using a java architecture, to have a base JSP and ensure the base JSP calls this.

Any better ideas?

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There's many possibilites, depending on which Language/Framework you want to use. This problem doesn't require a JSP solution. Any hint on what you would use? –  Searle Jun 29 '12 at 23:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need some server side framework... If you use some templating library (jade handlebars, mustache, jquery templates) or if you simply separate out your HTML files you can pull them each in with jquery and render them on the page. Check out the .load function.

Also, you should separate out your html pages even if they are static.

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Wrap it in a function and call the function. Then you can just call the function and leave the implementation to the function call. Since you didn't specify a server side technology such asp.net or php of course there would be other options (partial views or templates) using that.

function doStuff(){

   $("a[href^='http://']:not([href*='"+location.hostname+"']),     
     [href^='https://']:not([href*='"+location.hostname+"'])")
     .addClass("external")
     .attr("target","_blank")
     .attr("title","Opens new window").click(function(e) {alert('You are leaving mysite and going somewhere else, you crazy dude')});

}

<script>
   doStuff();
</script>
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This depends on how your site is structured. If you've got a server-side framework (like your JSP example), then you can have a function that makes sure that the script somehow gets included.

If you just have static HTML pages, my recommendation would be to put that code in a script file (let's say dontleaveme.js). Then on every page, just do

<script src="dontleaveme.js"></script>
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Understood but prone to human error. –  dublintech Jun 30 '12 at 7:07

A good application design will have a layout file or header and footer files which are used on every page. Then it is easy to make changes, such as adding a script, which affect every page on the site. If you are not using this technique, this is a great reason to start.

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