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Take a look at the following admittedly useless code:

<?php
session_start();
$_SESSION["key-".rand(1,1000)] = time();
print_r($_SESSION);
die();

If you were to run this from your local machine, it would print out something like this:

Array
(
    [key-272] => 1341011374
)

If you leave the code exactly the way it is, and refresh your browser, you'd see something very similar to this:

Array
(
    [key-272] => 1341011374
    [key-954] => 1341011374
    [key-895] => 1341011379
)

Refresh again:

Array
(
    [key-272] => 1341011374
    [key-954] => 1341011374
    [key-895] => 1341011379
    [key-337] => 1341011379
    [key-15] => 1341011869
)

And so on, each time adding two records to the $_SESSION array (not just one like I would expect). Also, notice how in each pair of added records, the first value is identical to the previous added record, but the key is a differently generated random number.

Can anyone explain what's happening here?

UPDATE 1

As I've mentioned to others in comments, notice that the first request only sets one $_SESSION value, then every time after it sets 2.

Starting with the 2nd request, when it sets 2 values per request, the timestamps aren't the same. If the request was happening twice, you'd expect them to be the same or close, but the first in each pair is always identical to the previous request's timestamp, even if you wait a long time in between. Bizarre.

UPDATE 2

I checked in Firefox and Safari just now, and got slightly strange results at first and then everything seemed to work as expected with only one record added per request. I've stripped all of the code out and left just the code you see here, in a plain index.php file with no other code in it. And yet, in Chrome, it behaves exactly the same way as I've described above.

Seems to be a Chrome-centered or at least Chrome-related problem, but I still have no ideas about why? Unless every one of your scripts is idempotent, having them run twice seems like a pretty awful bug...

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1  
Something's wrong with your setup - I just ran it and didn't observe more than 1 entry being added per page load. –  Sam Dufel Jun 29 '12 at 23:28
1  
Same here, can't reproduce. –  Mahn Jun 29 '12 at 23:28
    
are you hitting the refresh button too fast? chrome instant loading the page once before you? try to debug it with Firebug or Chrome dev tools –  Dvir Azulay Jun 29 '12 at 23:29
    
you probably have some broken html or javascript causing the browser to issue multiple requests to the webserver. empty src attributes are common cause. –  goat Jun 29 '12 at 23:30
1  
Doesn't seem at all strange to me. That timing just seems to indicate that it's run twice at about the same time, but it prints before the second time occurs. It gets set, it prints, then the second one gets set. Next time you refresh and print out the array, you'll see that the second one had been added earlier, and now there's one more element in the array than you see in the printout. Definitely seems like a second request made by something that doesn't print its output directly to your window like your "regular" page load would. –  Wiseguy Jun 30 '12 at 4:28
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1 Answer

If you start doing those tests do not do them with a rand since that might even be a duplicate. Next to that don't test on only a small amount of testing (refreshes) but do them on a decent amount. You could do that with lots of testing frameworks sending thousands of requests to see a substantial result. Also test with different browsers to get a real testing result.

Based on the definitions of sessions it does not make sense. Loading some resource like an image or stylesheet may also generate those issues.

Also check for links to other pages on the same applications since they might be preloaded. In general POST forms won't but links would.

This general issue is not likely because of the standard of PHP, which does not mean it couldn't be a bug. Though, first check everything on your side before thinking about structural issues in a quite common spread language. If there would be such a bug it would harm lots and lots of websites.

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