Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I receive the following path

char* path = "home/directory/file.txt"

How could I handle this string to get just file.txt's parent directory to get this

"home/directory"

I would like to code something that worked this way

char* _get_ParentDir(char* file_path);

and that this function would return the parent's path.

share|improve this question
    
just scan from the right and replace the first / with a \0 character. You need a for loop for this. –  user1095108 Jun 29 '12 at 23:29
1  
@user1095108: No, you just need strrchr(). –  Keith Thompson Jun 29 '12 at 23:30
1  
@KeithThompson: Thank you very much Keith! so, i should use strrchr() to get the position of the last / and replace it with "\0" ? Is it so? –  Guillermo Gruschka Jun 29 '12 at 23:33
1  
@GuillermoGruschka Be careful with replacing, if you are handed a string literal, trying to modify it is undefined behaviour. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 29 '12 at 23:34
    
@DanielFischer: Thank you very much for your feedback, I will sure keep it in mind. –  Guillermo Gruschka Jun 29 '12 at 23:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, don't give your function a name starting with an underscore. Such identifiers are reserved to the implementation.

Based on your description, you can just replace the last / character with a null character:

char *last_slash = strrchr(path, '/');
if (last_slash != NULL) {
    *last_slash = '\0';
}

That modifies the string in place -- but you want a function. Writing a function that returns a pointer to a string is tricky; you have to worry about allocating the space for the string. There are three common approaches:

  1. Declare a static array in your function, and return a pointer to its first element. Problem: every call to the function will clobber the buffer used by any previous calls.

  2. Have the caller pass a pointer to a buffer into which the result is written. This makes things more complex for the caller.

  3. Have the function allocate the buffer using malloc() (and be sure to check for allocation failures). This works, but it makes the caller responsible for free()ing the buffer later.

Your system may also provide a function that does this for you. Another answer mentions a dirname() function in <libgen.h>. That's specified by POSIX, but not by the C standard; your system may or may not have it. You should read the man page (man 3 dirname if you're on a Unix-like system), particularly the NOTES section.

share|improve this answer
    
...or in this specific case, you can just return the number of characters in the prefix of the string that comprises the parent dir name. –  reuben Jun 29 '12 at 23:35
    
@KeithThompson: 100% understood! Regarding the responsability of free()ing the buffer, I am still not sure of how is this going to be handled. This function will be used as a parameter for other functions, so thats why I need it to return the string itself. Supose i will delete a file from a directory, and i want to update the father directory, I will do something like (dummy names) updateFather(get_ParentDir(file)); –  Guillermo Gruschka Jun 29 '12 at 23:43
    
Names beginning with an underscore are fine. The names reserved for the implementation are those beginning with an underscore followed by another underscore or a capital letter. –  Thom Smith Jun 29 '12 at 23:51
2  
@ThomSmith: C standard, 7.1.3p1: "All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use. All identifiers that begin with an underscore are always reserved for use as identifiers with file scope in both the ordinary and tag name spaces." You can use some identifiers starting with underscores in some contexts, but it's much easier just to avoid them. –  Keith Thompson Jun 29 '12 at 23:55
    
@KeithThompson: Regarding where lays the responsability for free()ing the buffer, suposing I use it as a parameter for other functions as explained in my previous comment, what would you suggest? Thank you very much for your help! I was really stuck at this. –  Guillermo Gruschka Jun 29 '12 at 23:58
const char* bname=path;
bname+=strlen(path);
while (bname>path && bname[-1]!='\\' && bname[-1]!='/')
   --bname;

There is also the basename() function, but my version works for both DOS and Unix/Linux paths.

[Edit: I'd like to mention that I posted the following line by itself at approximately the same time as Ernest Friedman-Hill posted his comment below. After that, I went on to post the rest of my answer. -phonetagger] Oops... I read your problem backwards. You want the dirname() function. #include <libgen.h>

Or....

const char* dname = strdup(path);
const char* bname = dname;
if (dname)
{
   bname+=strlen(path);
   while (bname>dname && bname[-1]!='\\' && bname[-1]!='/')
      --bname;
   if (bname != dname)
      bname[-1] = '\0';
   else
   {
      bname = path;
      free(dname);
      dname = NULL;
   }
}

Note that this version allocates a new string for dname, which you may or may not want to free(), depending on the life you need it to have. If you need it for the duration of your application's execution, there's no need to free() it at all, the OS will automatically reclaim your process's entire virtual address space on application exit.

Also note that the strdup() is necessary, as your assignment of char* path is from a static const string initializer, which is most likely allocated in a read-only section of your program (perhaps .rodata, depending on your compiler).

share|improve this answer
    
Technically your version doesn't work at all, since at the end of this, the user still doesn't have a pointer to the directory path, which is what he wanted. I'll remove the downvote if you fix it up to provide the actual directory path. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 29 '12 at 23:33
    
strdup can return NULL. And bname>path is undefined. And dname = NULL leaks memory. –  Jim Balter Jun 30 '12 at 0:42
    
OK, I am appropriately spanked. –  phonetagger Jun 30 '12 at 1:00
    
There... that should fix it. Guess I got a bit careless! –  phonetagger Jun 30 '12 at 1:05

Just sticking a '\0' at the last slash has a possibly unintended side-effect on the original string. to avoid this, you will need to create another string:

char* _get_ParentDir(char* file_path) {
    char *c = strrchr(file_path, "/");
    long n = c - file_path;
    char *dir = malloc(n+1); // this will need to be freed later
    dir[n] = 0;
    memcpy(dir, file_path, n);
    return dir;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Regarding the responsability of free()ing the buffer, I am still not sure of how is this going to be handled. This function will be used as a parameter for other functions, so thats why I need it to return the string itself. Supose i will delete a file from a directory, and i want to update the father directory, I will do something like (dummy names) updateFather(get_ParentDir(file)); –  Guillermo Gruschka Jun 29 '12 at 23:46
    
malloc can return NULL. Also, strncpy is rarely the right solution for anything. Its flaws are avoided here, but memcpy is more straightforward and faster (considerably so on some architectures). –  Jim Balter Jun 30 '12 at 0:49
2  
strrchr does not return an integer. –  R.. Jun 30 '12 at 1:30
    
Thanks, I update the code. –  Yusuf X Jul 1 '12 at 6:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.