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I have a web method like this as part of a web service

public List<CustomObject> GetInformation() {
    List<CustomObject> cc = new List<CustomObject>();

    // Execute a SQL command
    dr = SQL.Execute(sql);

    if (dr != null) {
       while(dr.Read()) {
           CustomObject c = new CustomObject()
           c.Key = dr[0].ToString();
           c.Value = dr[1].ToString();
           c.Meta = dr[2].ToString();
           cc.Add(c);
       }
    }
    return cc;
}

I want to incorporate error handling into this so that if the no rows are returned or if dr is null or if something else goes wrong, I want to return the exception in the form of an error description. However, if the function is returning List<CustomObject> how can I also return an error message to the client when something goes wrong?

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3  
An Exception alters the normal flow of execution. The method either exits normally, passing its return value, or it exits via Exception, in which case there is no value returned. If you catch and handle the Exceptions within that method, you could return a Tuple<List<CustomObject>, Exception>, but I have never seen that done. –  hatchet Jun 30 '12 at 0:37
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I will create a wrapper class which has both your List of CustomObject and the error information as another Property.

public class MyCustomerInfo
{
  public List<CustomObject> CustomerList { set;get;}
  public string ErrorDetails { set;get;}

  public MyCustomerInfo()
  {
    if(CustomerList==null)
       CustomerList=new List<CustomObject>();  
  }
}

Now I will return an object of this class from my Method

public MyCustomerInfo GetCustomerDetails()
{
  var customerInfo=new MyCustomerInfo();

  // Execute a SQL command
    try
    {
      dr = SQL.Execute(sql);

      if(dr != null) {
         while(dr.Read()) {
           CustomObject c = new CustomObject();
           c.Key = dr[0].ToString();
           c.Value = dr[1].ToString();
           c.Meta = dr[2].ToString();
           customerInfo.CustomerList.Add(c);
         }
      }
      else
      {
          customerInfo.ErrorDetails="No records found";
      } 
   }
   catch(Exception ex)
   {
       //Log the error in this layer also if you need it.
       customerInfo.ErrorDetails=ex.Message;
   }     
  return customerInfo;    
}

EDIT: To make it more reusable and generic, It is a good idea to create a seperate class to handle this. and I will have this in my Baseclass as a property

public class OperationStatus
{
  public bool IsSuccess { set;get;}
  public string ErrorMessage { set;get;}
  public string ErrorCode { set;get;}
  public string InnerException { set;get;}
}
public class BaseEntity
{
  public OperationStatus OperationStatus {set;get;}
  public BaseEntity()
  {
      if(OperationStatus==null)
         OperationStatus=new OperationStatus();
  } 
}

And Let all your Child entities involved in a transaction inherit from this base class.

   public MyCustomInfo : BaseEntity
   {
      public List<CustomObject> CustomerList { set;get;}
      //Your constructor logic to initialize property values
   } 

Now from your Method you may set the values of OperationStatus property as needed

public MyCustomInfo GetThatInfo()
{
    var thatObject=new MyCustomInfo();
    try
    {
       //Do something 
       thatObject.OperationStatus.IsSuccess=true;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
      thatObject.OperationStatus.ErrorMessage=ex.Message;
      thatObject.OperationStatus.InnerException =(ex.InnerException!=null)?ex.InnerException:"";
    }
    return thatObject;
}
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Consider making a "StatusInfo" or similar object that holds an error Code + error details. 2 reasons: 1) ErrorCode=0 is better (IMHO) than checking for null/blank Message 2) The simple class is reusable and becomes part of a larger pattern of your contracts with Your callers. –  brian chandley Jun 30 '12 at 0:52
    
@brianchandley: Yea. I just showed like this so that the OP will get an Idea. I usually have different class for the OperationStatus to handle this. I Guess it is good idea to update that. will do –  Shyju Jun 30 '12 at 1:01
    
+1 Thank you for both the approaches. My code is still at an early stage so I adopted the more generic reusable approach which I felt was very beautiful. Thank you once again. –  Legend Jun 30 '12 at 1:22
    
@Legend : You are welcome. Glad i could be of some help :) –  Shyju Jun 30 '12 at 1:23
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Are you using WCF? If so consider using faults.

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