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I am trying to implement this bit of code:

func factorial(x int) (result int) {
  if x == 0 {
    result = 1;
  } else {
    result = x * factorial(x - 1);
  }
  return;
}

as a big.Int so as to make it effective for larger values of x.

The following is returning a value of 0 for fmt.Println(factorial(r))

The factorial of 7 should be 5040?

Any ideas on what I am doing wrong?

package main

import "fmt"
import "math/big"

func main() {
        fmt.Println("Hello, playground")

    //n := big.NewInt(40)
    r := big.NewInt(7)

    fmt.Println(factorial(r))

}

func factorial(n *big.Int) (result *big.Int) {
    //fmt.Println("n = ", n)
    b := big.NewInt(0)
    c := big.NewInt(1)

    if n.Cmp(b) == -1 {
        result = big.NewInt(1)
    }
    if n.Cmp(b) == 0 {
        result = big.NewInt(1)
    } else {
        // return n * factorial(n - 1);
        fmt.Println("n = ", n)
        result = n.Mul(n, factorial(n.Sub(n, c)))
    }
    return result
}

This code on go playground: http://play.golang.org/p/yNlioSdxi4

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In your int version, every int is distinct. But in your big.Int version, you're actually sharing big.Int values. So when you say

result = n.Mul(n, factorial(n.Sub(n, c)))

The expression n.Sub(n, c) actually stores 0 back into n, so when n.Mul(n, ...) is evaluated, you're basically doing 0 * 1 and you get back 0 as a result.

Remember, the results of big.Int operations don't just return their value, they also store them into the receiver. This is why you see repetition in expressions like n.Mul(n, c), e.g. why it takes n again as the first parameter. Because you could also sayresult.Mul(n, c) and you'd get the same value back, but it would be stored in result instead of n.

Here is your code rewritten to avoid this problem:

func factorial(n *big.Int) (result *big.Int) {
    //fmt.Println("n = ", n)
    b := big.NewInt(0)
    c := big.NewInt(1)

    if n.Cmp(b) == -1 {
        result = big.NewInt(1)
    }
    if n.Cmp(b) == 0 {
        result = big.NewInt(1)
    } else {
        // return n * factorial(n - 1);
        fmt.Println("n = ", n)
        result = new(big.Int)
        result.Set(n)
        result.Mul(result, factorial(n.Sub(n, c)))
    }
    return
}

And here is a slightly more cleaned-up/optimized version (I tried to remove extraneous allocations of big.Ints): http://play.golang.org/p/feacvk4P4O

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You! Yes those results of big.Int operations do get a little bit tricky. –  Greg Jun 30 '12 at 1:11
1  
@Greg: Here is a much more compact implication that skips recursion and goes straight for a for loop instead. –  Kevin Ballard Jun 30 '12 at 1:15
    
OK, Great! That works too. –  Greg Jun 30 '12 at 1:35

Go package math.big has func (*Int) MulRange(a, b int64). When called with the first parameter set to 1, it will return b!:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/big"
)

func main() {
    x := new(big.Int)
    x.MulRange(1, 10)
    fmt.Println(x)
}

Will produce

3628800

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1  
That is x.MulRange, not x.mulRange. –  Attila O. Mar 11 '14 at 9:56
    
Underrated answer here. Most usages probably don't need a big.Int as the input to a factorial method, only as a return type (because only the answer is very large). If that is the case, MulRange is much simpler (and faster). –  TM. Dec 1 '14 at 4:24

Non-recursive version:

func FactorialBig(n uint64) (r *big.Int) {
    //fmt.Println("n = ", n)
    one, bn := big.NewInt(1), new(big.Int).SetUint64(n)
    r = big.NewInt(1)
    if bn.Cmp(one) <= 0 {
        return
    }
    for i := big.NewInt(2); i.Cmp(bn) <= 0; i.Add(i, one) {
        r.Mul(r, i)
    }
    return
}

playground

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For example,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/big"
)

func factorial(x *big.Int) *big.Int {
    n := big.NewInt(1)
    if x.Cmp(big.NewInt(0)) == 0 {
        return n
    }
    return n.Mul(x, factorial(n.Sub(x, n)))
}

func main() {
    r := big.NewInt(7)
    fmt.Println(factorial(r))
}

Output:

5040
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