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Newbie R question. Sorry to ask: I'm sure it's been answered, but it's one that's hard to search, apparently. I've read the man page for var (variance), but I don't understand it. Checked books, web pages (OK, only two books). I'll wait for someone to point me to an existing answer ....

> df
first second
1     1      3
2     2      5
3     3      7

> df[,2]
[1] 3 5 7

> var(df[,2])
[1] 4

OK, so far, so good.

> df[1,]
  first second
1     1      3
> var(df[1,])
       first second
first     NA     NA
second    NA     NA

Huh??

Thanks in advance. !

share|improve this question
    
I don't have a complete answer but Ill add a bit anyway. R thinks you are passing in a matrix like object when you give the row, a vector when you pass in the column. I agree it is a bit wierd. If, instead of using a data frame you use a matrix R figures it out a bit better. –  Seth Jun 30 '12 at 2:03

2 Answers 2

The first issue is that you get a different class of object when you select a row from a data.frame, than when you select a column:

df = data.frame(first=c(1, 2, 3), second=c(3, 5, 7))

class(df[, 2])
[1] "integer"

class(df[1, ])
[1] "data.frame"

# But you can explicitly convert with as.integer.
var(as.integer(df[1, ]))
# [1] 2

The second issue is that var() treats a data.frame quite differently. It treats each column as variable and computes a matrix of variances and covariances by comparing each column to every other column:

# Create a data frame with some random data.
dat = data.frame(first=rnorm(20), second=rnorm(20), third=rnorm(20))

var(dat)
#              first     second       third
# first   0.98363062 -0.2453755  0.04255154
# second -0.24537550  1.1177863 -0.16445768
# third   0.04255154 -0.1644577  0.58928970

var(dat$third)
# [1] 0.5892897

cov(dat$first, dat$second)
# [1] -0.2453755
share|improve this answer

If you know that a data.frame is all numeric and want it to be available for both row and column operations, then convert it to a matrix:

dat = data.frame(first=rnorm(20), second=rnorm(20), third=rnorm(20))
dm <- data.matrix(df)
var(dm[1,])
#[1] 20.25

(The same effect occurs when you use apply() .... the list structure is lost and the rows are all converted to the lowest common denominator.)

> apply(dat, 1, var)
 [1] 0.45998066 1.51241166 0.13634927 0.49981030 0.04440448 1.21224067 0.28113135 0.57968597
 [9] 0.26102036 0.41999510 1.01237100 0.17304770 0.50572223 1.17825272 1.39342510 2.94125062
[17] 1.18640684 2.15245595 3.06482195 0.96396008
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That's great. Bizarre, but I'm sure that it makes sense in some context. –  Mars Jul 1 '12 at 8:40

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