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I am trying to create a new class Dog that inherits via prototypical inheritance from the Animal class:

function Animal() {
  this.name = "animal";
  this.writeName = function() {
    document.write(this.name);
  }    
}

function Dog() {
  this.name = "dog";
  this.prototype = new Animal();
}

new Dog().writeName()

JS Fiddle

However, I get a Javascript error: Uncaught TypeError: Object #<Dog> has no method 'say'.

Why? Shouldn't the Dog object retain an Animal object as a prototype?

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Are you sure you pasted the right code? The word say doesn't appear there once. –  Ned Batchelder Jun 30 '12 at 1:28
    
Because there are no classes? ;) But the issue is that this is already the wrong object at that time (as well as the [[prototype]] being too late for new to utilize). –  user166390 Jun 30 '12 at 1:32
2  
BTW, use console.log instead of document.write and alert. It will make your life so much easier in the long run. –  hugomg Jun 30 '12 at 1:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@ryan's answer is correct, of course, but he doesn't really say what's different about it and it might not be clear to a beginner, so...

The mistake you're making is that this.prototype = new Animal(); assigns an Animal instance to a property named prototype on the current Dog instance (referred to by this), but there's nothing special about a property named prototype in this context.

The prototype property is only magical on function objects. When you create a new instance of SomeFunc using new SomeFunc() that new object's internal/hidden [[prototype]] pointer will refer to the object pointed to by SomeFunc.prototype. The prototype name isn't special in any other context.

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1  
yea was in a hurry thanks for clarifying that for him. –  ryan Jul 1 '12 at 22:21

The "prototype" property is just a regular property. The real [[Proto]] property that deals with delegation is hidden and can't be directly manipulated after an object is created (except with some extensions: in Firefox, its the __proto__ property).

A correct Javascript inheritance example that is similar in spirit to what you are doing would use Object.create to create a dog with the correct [[Prototype]] property:

function Animal() {
  this.name = "animal";
  this.writeName = function() {
    document.write(this.name);
  }    
}

function Dog() {
  var dog = Object.create(new Animal())
  dog.name = "dog";
  return dog;
}

(new Dog()).writeName()

A more idiomatic example would be something like ryan's answer, although I would recommend using Object.create instead of new Animal to instantiate the dog prototype and I would put the animal methods in a separate animal prototype instead of manually attaching them in the constructor like you are doing.

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@pst: I was talking about how he was expecting the "prototype" property to behave specially. –  hugomg Jun 30 '12 at 1:35
    
Okay, that's better, +1 :-) Is Object.create(proto) [natively] available in 3rd edition, though? –  user166390 Jun 30 '12 at 1:37
    
@pst: I can't remember now, but its very easy to write a polyfill for it when its not available: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  hugomg Jun 30 '12 at 1:45
    
Someone recently added an answer to this so it showed up in my list, this is a strange way of using prototype and Object.create. Animal has instance member (namely this.name) you can "inherit" by calling Animal.call(this,"dog"); in the Dog constructor. Animal has shared member (writeName) that should be declared as Animal.prototye.writeName=function() that can be inherited by Dog with Dog.prototype=Object.create(Animal.prototype); So as to not completely overwrite the Dog prototype every time you create a Dog instance. stackoverflow.com/a/16063711/1641941 –  HMR Nov 12 '13 at 14:46
    
@HMR: THe reason this looks weird is because I'm using the new keyword to call my constructors but I'm not taking advantage of the .prototype magic. This was to keep things closer to the original question but I'd guess it might be clearer to go all the way and rename the functions to make_animal and make_dog and invoke them without the new keyword, since this way its explicit that my code isn't actually using this anywhere. –  hugomg Nov 12 '13 at 23:03
function Animal() {
  this.name = "animal";
  this.writeName = function() {
    document.write(this.name);
  }    
}

function Dog() {
  this.name = "dog";

}
Dog.prototype = new Animal();
dog = new Dog();
dog.writeName();

now dog has all of the properties of animal.

jsfiddle

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