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My program experiences a seg fault in the middle of the loop iteration. After calling the function intermediate, the inter_value prints until inter_value[199][208], and then, I have a seg fault. To make sure it is not out of bound access, I print the array inter_value first and the array prints without any problem.

Is this a symbol of running out of memory? The array ct and inter_value are created by malloc, key_byte is a static array.

D = 200;
K = 256;
for(j = 0; j < D; j++)
    for(i = 0; i < K; i++)
        printf("inter_value[%i][%i] = %i\n", j, i, inter_value[j][i]);

for(j = 0; j < D; j++) {
    for(i = 0; i < K; i++) {
        intermediate(ct[j][0], key_byte[i], &inter_value[j][i]);
        printf("inter_value[%i][%i] = %i\n", j, i, inter_value[j][i]);
        fflush(stdout);
    }
}
printf("rex\n");


for(j = 0; j < D; j++) {
    for(i = 0; i < K; i++) {
        hamming_dist(ct[j][0], inter_value[j][i], &h[j][i]);
    }
}

Function intermediate is here

void intermediate(unsigned char ct, unsigned char key_byte, unsigned char *inter_value){
    *inter_value = getSBoxInvert(ct^key_byte);
}

Edit 1: Declaration of arrays.

//initialize different intermediate values
inter_value = (unsigned char**)malloc(D * sizeof(unsigned char*));
if(inter_value == NULL){
    fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
    return 0;
}
for(i = 0; i < D; i++){
    inter_value[i] = (unsigned char *)malloc(K * sizeof(unsigned char)); // this is fix to key size
    if(inter_value[i] == NULL){
        fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
        return 0;
    }
}


//ct = malloc(row * sizeof(unsigned char*));
ct = (unsigned char**)malloc(D * sizeof(unsigned char*));
if(ct == NULL){
    fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
    return 0;
}
for(i = 0; i < D; i++){
    //ct[i] = malloc(column * sizeof(unsigned char));
    ct[i] = (unsigned char *)malloc(column * sizeof(unsigned char));
    if(ct[i] == NULL){
        fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
        return 0;
    }
}

unsigned char key_byte[256] = {0};

Edit 2: The print out before seg fault.

inter_value[199][233] = 214
inter_value[199][234] = 119
inter_value[199][2

Edit 3: gdb output (It seems it is pointing to another function)

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x0804a3f5 in hamming_dist (ct=31 '\037', inter_value=203 '\313', h=0x2) at cpa.cpp:53 53 *h = c;

Edit 4: After issue backtrace command from gdb...

#0 0x0804a3f5 in hamming_dist (ct=31 '\037', inter_value=203 '\313', h=0x2) at cpa.cpp:53

#1 0x0804aff5 in main (argc=3, argv=0xbffff2f4) at cpa.cpp:266

Edit 5: Add the hamming_dist function call and a printf call before it.

Edit 6: Initialization of h

int **h;
h = (unsigned int**)malloc(D * sizeof(unsigned int*));
if(h == NULL){
    fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
    return 0;
}
for(i = 0; i < D; i++){
    h[i] = (unsigned int*)malloc(K * sizeof(unsigned int)); // this is fix to key size
    if(h[i] == NULL){
        fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
        return 0;
    }
}

Edit 7: The hamming_dist function declaration.

void hamming_dist(unsigned char ct, unsigned char inter_value, int *h){
    int temp;
    temp = ct ^ inter_value;
    //then count No. of ones
    int c; // c accumulates the total bits set in v
    for (c = 0; temp; c++)
        temp &= temp - 1; // clear the least significant bit set

    *h = c;
}
share|improve this question
    
Printing the value is not sufficient to prove that you are not accessing out-of-bounds. How is inter_value declared? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 30 '12 at 1:35
1  
present a minimal complete example that exhibits the problem, please –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 30 '12 at 1:42
7  
Make sure that your printfs are being flushed. And for Ritchie's sake, use a debugger! –  Jim Balter Jun 30 '12 at 1:55
2  
@JimBalter: It's actually not harmless. On some (older) compilers (i.e., VS which implements C89) casting the return value may hide the fact that you forgot to include stdlib.h because it will be assumed to return an int.. Really though, you shouldn't write unnecessary code, and it shows that the person who did it doesn't really understand how C treats pointer types –  Ed S. Jun 30 '12 at 2:28
1  
casting malloc result is not a good idea in C, because it can disguise an undeclared malloc (which the compiler thinks is returning int) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 30 '12 at 2:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your seg fault is because &h[j][i] is 0x2 when passed as the value of the hamming_dist parameter h, which attempts to dereference it and store into it. This is apparently because of an earlier out-of-bounds store that overwrote h[j].

Note that writing out of bounds in a malloced buffer can have effects that don't show up until arbitrarily later in your program. They may not show up at all ... until you release the code and some customer runs it with inputs that happen to trigger the bug.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually initialize h... Please see my Edit 6. –  dannycrane Jun 30 '12 at 2:54
    
I also added the hamming_dist function definition. –  dannycrane Jun 30 '12 at 2:56
    
Please stop with all these edits and just post the relevant parts of the program in order. The fact is that &h[j][i] has the value of 0x2 when it is passed to hamming_dist, which does *h = c;, which will cause a seg fault. Spend more time figuring out why and less time posting snippets to SO. –  Jim Balter Jun 30 '12 at 2:58
    
Thank you for the patient advice..This may sound too naive, but *h = c looks perfect to me..I am assigning a value to the pointer. Which works when my array size is small. –  dannycrane Jun 30 '12 at 3:02
    
How can it look perfect to you when the value of h is ===> 2 <===? Please pay attention, as I have pointed this out numerous times now. It says so right here: Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x0804a3f5 in hamming_dist (ct=31 '\037', inter_value=203 '\313', h=0x2) at cpa.cpp:53 ... do you think that gdb is lying to you? Do you think that it cleverly figured out something that would cause a seg fault but isn't really happening in your program? The fact is that it is clear as day: h is 2, you try to store an int at location 2, it memfaults. Go fix it. –  Jim Balter Jun 30 '12 at 3:07

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