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I have had a few occasions where something like this would be helpful. I have, for instance, an AccountCreator with a Create method that takes a NewAccount. My AccountCreator has an IRepository that will eventually be used to create the account. My AccountCreator will first map the properties from NewAccount to Account, second pass the Account to the repo to finally create it. My tests look something like this:

public class when_creating_an_account
{
    static Mock<IRepository> _mockedRepository;
    static AccountCreator _accountCreator;
    static NewAccount _newAccount;
    static Account _result;
    static Account _account;

    Establish context = () =>
        {
            _mockedRepository = new Mock<IRepository>();
            _accountCreator = new AccountCreator(_mockedRepository.Object);

            _newAccount = new NewAccount();
            _account = new Account();

            _mockedRepository
                .Setup(x => x.Create(Moq.It.IsAny<Account>()))
                .Returns(_account);
        };

    Because of = () => _result = _accountCreator.Create(_newAccount);

    It should_create_the_account_in_the_repository = () => _result.ShouldEqual(_account);
}

So, what I need is something to replace It.IsAny<Account>, because that doesn't help me verify that the correct Account was created. What would be amazing is something like...

public class when_creating_an_account
{
    static Mock<IRepository> _mockedRepository;
    static AccountCreator _accountCreator;
    static NewAccount _newAccount;
    static Account _result;
    static Account _account;

    Establish context = () =>
        {
            _mockedRepository = new Mock<IRepository>();
            _accountCreator = new AccountCreator(_mockedRepository.Object);

            _newAccount = new NewAccount
                {
                    //full of populated properties
                };
            _account = new Account
                {
                    //matching properties to verify correct mapping
                };

            _mockedRepository
                .Setup(x => x.Create(Moq.It.IsLike<Account>(_account)))
                .Returns(_account);
        };

    Because of = () => _result = _accountCreator.Create(_newAccount);

    It should_create_the_account_in_the_repository = () => _result.ShouldEqual(_account);
}

Notice I changed It.IsAny<> to It.IsLike<> and passed in a populated Account object. Ideally, in the background, something would compare the property values and let it pass if they all match.

So, does it exist already? Or might this be something you have done before and wouldn't mind sharing the code?

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1  
Moq supports custom matchers - as in, you can have custom comparers used when matching arguments for a call, but you have to implement that yourself. See example here. –  jimmy_keen Jul 2 '12 at 10:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

To stub out a repository to return a particular value based on like criteria, the following should work:

_repositoryStub
    .Setup(x => x.Create(
        Moq.It.Is<Account>(a => _maskAccount.ToExpectedObject().Equals(a)))
    .Returns(_account);
share|improve this answer
    
Now, THAT'S what I was looking for! Thanks Derek! –  Byron Sommardahl Jul 5 '12 at 21:32
    
In case anyone stumbled across this answer and wants to try the same thing, you've got to include the ExpectedObjects library. github.com/derekgreer/expectedObjects or install-package ExpectedObjects –  Byron Sommardahl Jul 9 '12 at 17:12

The following should work for you:

Moq.It.Is<Account>(a=>a.Property1 == _account.Property1)

However as it was mentioned you have to implement matching criteria.

share|improve this answer
    
I use that every day. But imagine "a" is a class with 50 properties. I would rather be able to use the expected object pattern to compare the actual object (with all it's properties) to an expected object (with all it's expected properties). That's what I'm holding out for. –  Byron Sommardahl Jul 5 '12 at 17:32

I was not able to find anything that does exactly what is described in the question. In the mean time, the best way I can find to handle verification of objects passed in as arguments to mocked methods (without the luxury of referencial equality) is a combination of Callback and the Expected Object pattern to compare the actual with the expected object:

public class when_creating_an_account
{
    static Mock<IRepository> _mockedRepository;
    static AccountCreator _accountCreator;
    static NewAccount _newAccount;
    static Account _result;
    static Account _expectedAccount;
    static Account _actualAccount;

    Establish context = () =>
        {
            _mockedRepository = new Mock<IRepository>();
            _accountCreator = new AccountCreator(_mockedRepository.Object);

            _newAccount = new NewAccount
                {
                    //full of populated properties
                };
            _expectedAccount = new Account
                {
                    //matching properties to verify correct mapping
                };

            _mockedRepository
                .Setup(x => x.Create(Moq.It.IsAny<Account>(_account)))
                //here, we capture the actual account passed in.
                .Callback<Account>(x=> _actualAccount = x) 
                .Returns(_account);
        };

    Because of = () => _result = _accountCreator.Create(_newAccount);

    It should_create_the_account_in_the_repository = 
        () => _result.ShouldEqual(_account);

    It should_create_the_expected_account = 
        () => _expectedAccount.ToExpectedObject().ShouldEqual(_actualAccount);
}

The expected object pattern is great, but it's complicated to implement in C#, so I use a library that handles all that for me. https://github.com/derekgreer/expectedObjects

My last observation looks at the properties in the actual account passed in and compares each to the same property on my "expected object". This way I don't have a huge list of mock property checks, nor do I have a ton of test observations.

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