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I am currently using find() and first() method to select the first descendent element from each of the <div> elements that contains the parent class. But I find this quite cumbersome since find() method would produce a set of matched elements before the first element is being picked. The following is the skeleton of my code:

HTML

<div class=parent>
 <ul>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
 </ul>
</div>
<div class=parent>
 <ul>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
 </ul>
</div>
<div class=non-parent>
 <ul>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
 </ul>
</div>
<div class=parent>
 <ul>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
  <li>random characters</li>
 </ul>
</div>
// .....the list continues

Javascript

$('.parent').each(function() {
 $(this).find('ul li').first().css('color', 'red');
// do other stuff (on other elements) within each loop
});

I have seen people using $(".parent li:first") selector. But, because I am doing it in a loop, I am not sure how or whether if this could be done and would like some advice. Thanks.

Clarification:

I need to do other stuff on other elements not shown in the HTML within each loop. Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you insist on both the outer loop and the :first selector, then use this:

$('.parent').each(function() {
    $(this).find('li:first').css('color', 'red');
    // do other stuff within each loop
});

Note that the following will not work:

$('.parent li:first').css('color', 'red');

....because it will simply select the first li descendant across all .parent elements.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, great. This is what I want. Thanks! – Question Overflow Jun 30 '12 at 3:22
    
:first and :first-child are not the same thing. :first-child selects all elements that are the first child of their parent, while :first filters the results to only the first match. – nbrooks Jun 30 '12 at 3:27
    
@nbrooks - Is there something about my post that led you to believe I didn't understand that? If so, I'll make it more clear. Specifically, notice the second half of my answer which implies the difference. – Wayne Burkett Jun 30 '12 at 3:37
    
Well you made a point of saying that the code specified wouldn't work, but nobody suggested that so I thought you had misread. The same line of code works if you use :first-child. Just clarifying. Good answer anyway :) – nbrooks Jun 30 '12 at 3:40
    
The code $(".parent li:first") appears in the OP's question. Your comments are probably useful to future visitors, though, so thanks. – Wayne Burkett Jun 30 '12 at 3:44

If you want to loop over the first element in each parent, you can do this:

$('.parent ul li:first-child').each(function() {
    $(this).css('color', 'red');
    // do other stuff within each loop
});

That doesn't have to be done in a loop though, as the .css() method will operate on all matched elements. This works too:

$('.parent ul li:first-child').css('color', 'red');

That will change all of them.

Another option if you want to loop over all lis is:

$('.parent ul li').each(function() {
    if($(this).is(":first-child"))
        $(this).css('color', 'red');
    // do other stuff within each loop
});

UPDATE: If you want to loop over each parent than do the other check subsequently, the following would be useful:

$('.parent').each(function() {
    // I assume that even if other uls are in parent, the ul you target is first

    $(this).find("ul li:first-child").first().css('color', 'red');

    // do other stuff within each loop
});
share|improve this answer
    
I assumed that what you want to do in the loop involved the same element, but you get the idea. – nbrooks Jun 30 '12 at 3:14
    
no, it applies to other elements. – Question Overflow Jun 30 '12 at 3:16
    
@ben You mean the other list-items? see update – nbrooks Jun 30 '12 at 3:18
    
I mean other elements not shown in my html. Sorry. I updated the clarification in my post. – Question Overflow Jun 30 '12 at 3:21

Take a look at this http://api.jquery.com/first-child-selector/

And by the way, you dont need the foreach...! Apply your css modifications directly to the collection!

$('.parent ul li:first-child').css('color', 'red');

Please, refer to this working example http://jsfiddle.net/9ej5H/

Note that Zee Tee answer is ok too, but less readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I understand first-child, but <li> is not a child but a grandchild. – Question Overflow Jun 30 '12 at 3:15
    
It's a child of the ul – Wayne Burkett Jun 30 '12 at 3:16
    
If I got right, please check this fiddle out jsfiddle.net/9ej5H – renatoargh Jun 30 '12 at 3:19
    
I need the each loop to do something else. lwburk got the answer. – Question Overflow Jun 30 '12 at 3:23
    
got your point, you need the other .parent divs - then his answer is better! (: – renatoargh Jun 30 '12 at 3:27

You can always use the index selector: $(".parent ul li:eq(0)")

or

$(".parent ul li").eq(0)

Just a note: 0 is the first one.

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