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I'm trying to get a short path of a file before the file is created. I found an example which can convert a path to a shortPath if the folder or file existed. However, is there a way to get short path before the file even exist?

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I'm pretty sure that is impossible. –  dbenham Jun 30 '12 at 5:31
    
I agree with dbenham. Maybe you could update your question with the root problem and we could work to help you with some other solution. –  Chris N Jul 1 '12 at 17:04
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the algorithm that creates shorts names does not look so hard to be recreated in powershell: 1.max lenght of file name is 12 symbold and 8 for dirs and files without extension . 2. only 3 letters are allowed for file extension. 3. last 2 symbols are taken for ~N where N is the number 4. if the N must have more than one digit text become shorter with 1 letter. –  npocmaka Jul 11 '12 at 17:02
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@npocmaka I like your suggestion of an algorithm, but it doesn't take into account the current state of the file system. Eg the short form of a proposed c:\one\verydanglongfoo.txt depends on whether c:\one\verydanglongbar.txt exists or not. –  azhrei Jul 18 '12 at 6:39
    
Yes.You'll need to keep a list of files with short names and to check if file with the short name exist .If you already have verydanglongbar.txt the short name of verydanglongfoo.txt will be VERYDA~2.TXT.It's just incrementing ~N .But if both files does not exist we'll have a problem. –  npocmaka Jul 18 '12 at 8:50

1 Answer 1

Thanks for all the comments. I think the easiest way to solve this problem is:

if file DOES NOT existed:
  generate shortPath
  return shortPath
else:
  touch a new file with exact name expected.
  generate shortPath
  remove temp file
  return shortPath
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