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I have two models in a has_many relationship such that Log has_many Items. Rails then nicely sets up things like: some_log.items which returns all of the associated items to some_log. If I wanted to order these items based on a different field in the Items model is there a way to do this through a similar construct, or does one have to break down into something like:

Item.find_by_log_id(:all,some_log.id => "some_col DESC")
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up vote 67 down vote accepted

There are multiple ways to do this:

If you want all calls to that association to be ordered that way, you can specify the ordering when you create the association, as follows:

class Log < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :items, :order => "some_col DESC"
end

You could also do this with a named_scope, which would allow that ordering to be easily specified any time Item is accessed:

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  named_scope :ordered, :order => "some_col DESC"
end

class Log < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :items
end

log.items # uses the default ordering
log.items.ordered # uses the "some_col DESC" ordering

If you always want the items to be ordered in the same way by default, you can use the (new in Rails 2.3) default_scope method, as follows:

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  default_scope :order => "some_col DESC"
end
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11  
Since Rails 3.x, the named_scope syntax is slightly different. It is now called using "scope" instead of "named_scope", and uses functions to define the scope structure. For instance : "scope :ordered, order("some_col DESC")". – PA. Buisson Nov 16 '11 at 20:17
7  
In Rails 4 there’s another approach again. The default association scope should be specified as a lambda like has_many :items, ->{ order(:some_col).where(foo: 'bar') } and, similarly, named scopes now take a lambda scope :name_of_scope, ->{ where(foo: 'bar') }. The default scope takes a block: default_scope: { where(foo: 'bar') } – Leo Oct 24 '13 at 15:32

rails 4.2.20 syntax requires calling with a block:

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  default_scope { order('some_col DESC') }
end

This can also be written with an alternate syntax:

default_scope { order(some_col: :desc) }
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set default_scope in your model class

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  default_scope :order => "some_col DESC"
end

This will work

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1  
does not work with rails 4 – SsouLlesS Mar 25 '15 at 20:03
1  
@SsouLlesS This has answered in 2011 when there was no Rails 4. – Sayuj Dec 16 '15 at 10:38

Either of these should work:

Item.all(:conditions => {:log_id => some_log.id}, :order => "some_col DESC")
some_log.items.all(:order => "some_col DESC")
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