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I've seen a lot of codes for this but it appears non of them work very well or at all. I've used pictures for rounded corners but I need the code so that it will round the border of a <table>. The only solutions I've found for this problem are to have images In the cells around the border. Anything else I can try?

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9 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Try:

selector {
    -moz-border-radius: 3px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 3px;
    border-radius: 3px;
}

This will work in Firefox, Safari, Chrome and any other CSS3-compatible browser. It may be easier to make a separate class for this - there are 3 statements which are needed for full compatibility.

Also, try here (cssjuice.com) for some more techniques using images.

I'm not completely sure whether this will work with a table, but if you're in complete control - don't use a <table> for layout. Please.

(Note - I think its fine to use the table tag for tabular data, just not where DIVs should be used.)

Update: to apply to one corner only:

-moz-border-radius-topleft: 3px;
/* ... */
-webkit-border-top-left-radius: 3px;

Continue for topright or top-right.

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There's no simple IE8 solution is there? –  JoshBerke Jul 14 '09 at 18:50
    
I'm not sure about IE8 to be honest - I use Firefox ;) –  Lucas Jones Jul 14 '09 at 18:52
4  
The table could actually be containing tabular information. There is still very large semantic value in the proper use of tables. –  Ian Elliott Jul 14 '09 at 18:53
1  
It's not about using them whenever you want for whatever you want, it's about using them properly when displaying tabular information. For instance, if I have a list of records to display from a database it is proper to display them in a table. Tables aren't designed for layouts, but they are designed for displaying tabular information, using them for such is proper semantics. –  Ian Elliott Jul 14 '09 at 19:01
6  
If it's not completely ugly to let IE have square borders, why not just do that? Let the good browsers have the pretty stuff. –  Nosredna Jul 15 '09 at 17:12
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Try the CSS 3 selectors:

.element {
border-radius:5px
}

For Safari, Google Chrome (Webkit) and Mozilla use the following two selectors (although Mozilla supports the CSS 3 selector (not sure if the other one does):

.element {
-webkit-border-radius:5px;
-moz-border-radius:5px;
}
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The only way to have support for all browsers is to use image backgrounds on the anchor tags, usually combined with an image on it's container tag as well.

For instance with HTML like this:

<ul>
 <li><a href="">something</a></li>
<ul>

I would place one image on the anchor tag, and one on the li, so that the element can be variable width and still have rounded corners.

There are CSS3 features and JS solutions that may also work, but are not completely cross browser compatible.

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You can round them through CSS but only for supported browsers.

Your other non-image options are script-based like jQuery Corners or a similar script.

Both of these methods have caveats (IE support, visitors with JavaScript disabled, etc.). If you're set on using them, I would focus on getting them to work with CSS in the browsers that support it and just make sure that it looks acceptable without them in IE.

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The jQuery Corners is a great non-image implementation even supporting anti-aliasing in IE. For fun I took a peek at the generated DOM after the "tweak" is run in IE... Ouch! Their sample page is rounded corner heavy for sure, but I'd say that about 85%+ of the final markup was DIV's and styles added to support IE. ;-) –  scunliffe Jul 14 '09 at 19:35
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Check out www.easyimg.com, simple solution that does not require css hacks or hours in photoshop.

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If you don't have to work with all browsers, consider using border-radius. See http://www.css3.info/preview/rounded-border/ for more information. Newer Mozilla and Webkit-based browsers support either this tag or moz-border-radius and -webkit-border-radius.

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Here is a way that isn't browser dependent (that I know of, it works on the popular browsers.) It doesn't use a table, so you'll have to put the table in the most deeply nested div and it is lengthy and heavy, but it works. The images referred to in the code below are the rounded corners you draw yourself. The radius of the corner is 44px.

This is a variation on: http://www.webcredible.co.uk/user-friendly-resources/css/css-round-corners-boxes.shtml

<div class="tl">
    <div class="tr">
        <div class="bl">
            <div class="br">
                <div class="t">
                    <div class="b">
                        <div class="l">
                            <div class="r">
                                <div>Do or do not, there is no try</div>
                            </div>
                        </div>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

.tl
{
    font-family: Verdana, Arial;
    font-size: 16px;
    position: relative;
    left: 30px; 
}

.tl, .tr, .bl, .br
{
    width: 655px;
    height: 250px;
}

.t
{
    width: 567px;
    height: 250px;    
    margin: 0 0 0 44px;
}

.b
{
    width: 567px;
    height: 250px;    
}

.l
{
    width: 655px;
    height: 162px;    
    margin: 44px 0 0 -44px; 
}

.r
{
    width: 655px;
    height: 162px; 
}

.bl
{
    background: url(/images/front/rcbla.png) 0 100% no-repeat;
}

.br
{
    background: url(/images/front/rcbra.png) 100% 100% no-repeat;
}

.tl
{
    background: url(/images/front/rctla.png) 0 0 no-repeat;
}

.tr
{
    background: url(/images/front/rctra.png) 100% 0 no-repeat;
} 

.t
{
    background: url(/images/front/adot.png) 0 0 repeat-x;
}

.b
{
    background: url(/images/front/adot.png) 0 100% repeat-x;
}

.l
{
    background: url(/images/front/adot.png) 0 0 repeat-y;
}

.r
{
    background: url(/images/front/adot.png) 100% 0 repeat-y;
}
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That is very heavy. Wouldn't it just be easier to use a table? –  Tony C Jul 15 '09 at 16:08
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I'm assuming that rounded corner CSS above wouldn't work in IE6. Something you may want to keep in mind.

Three stacked divs with background images is the easiest approach.

<div class="top">&nbsp;</div>
<div class="mid"> <!-- content --> </div>
<div class="bottom">&nbsp;</div>

The background for your div with id mid would be vertically tiled through CSS. Works in IE6.

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I tend to go with the border-radius option person-b covered earlier.

If I absolutely have to support IE (i.e. it's a fundamental part of the design and not just a little enhancement), I've had some success with dd_Roundies, which makes use of VML to get the job done.

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