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I want to restart a thread for some use, for example in the below code.

class Ex13 implements Runnable {
    int i = 0;

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Running " + ++i);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Thread th1 = new Thread(new Ex13(), "th1");
        th1.start();
            //th1.join() 
        Thread th2 = new Thread(th1);
        th2.start();
    }
}

When I'm executing the above program , some time i'm getting the output as Running 1 Running 2 and some time i'm getting only Running 1 After few run i'm getting only Running 1 as output. I'm totally surprise about this behavior. Can any one help me understand this. if I put the join() then i'm getting only Running 1.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You reuse Thread instance, not Runnable. Thread overwrites its run() method to

public void run() {
    if (target != null) {
        target.run();
    }
}

Where target is the Runnable that you give to the constructor. besides that, Thread has an exit() method that is called by the VM, and this method sets target to null (the reason is this bug). So if your first thread has the chance to finish its execution, its run() method is pretty much empty. Adding th1.join() proves it.

If you want to keep some state, you need to keep reference to your Runnable instance, not the Thread. This way run() method will not be altered.

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Thanks for your Explanation , this is exactly what i want to know.Is there any other way to get the reference of runnable from the dead thread. –  Krushna Jun 30 '12 at 16:15
    
@KrushnaCh.Dash: no, Thread has no such apis, you'd have to keep the reference somewhere yourself. Or rethink how you use it. Why exactly do you let the thread die? Maybe you can just let it live forever and use some condition variable to singal it to do some work? –  Denis Tulskiy Jun 30 '12 at 16:34

I don't know why do you need this, but (please note that this code doesn't ensure that th1 is ALWAYS executed before th2, though) :

public static class Ex13 implements Runnable {
    AtomicInteger i = new AtomicInteger(0);
    CountDownLatch latch;
    Ex13(CountDownLatch latch) {
        this.latch = latch;
    }
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Running " + i.incrementAndGet());
        latch.countDown();
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(2);
    Ex13 r = new Ex13(latch);
    Thread th1 = new Thread(r, "th1");
    th1.start();
    Thread th2 = new Thread(r);
    th2.start();
    latch.await(); // wait until both theads are executed
    System.out.println("Done");
}
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+1 for AtomicInteger, but non daemon Threads will run even after main method will end so why make main thread wait till other threads end? –  Pshemo Jun 30 '12 at 10:12
    
well, simply to know that all the threads are done (maybe it's necessary to do anything else after that...) –  Pavel K. Jun 30 '12 at 11:01
    
My sole aim is to restart a thread object, suppose, I got a thread object and , found that it's dead and I want start it again (Note If i called the start method on the same thread i will get Exception). So my approach is create a new thread object and wrap the old object inside it and called the start() method. But some time it's running fine. Some time not. To ensure that th1 is complete and then th2 should start we can put th1.join() also, but that is also not working.In your above code you are passing the runnable instance in 2nd time for th2. –  Krushna Jun 30 '12 at 13:55
    
IN the above code for the second thread if I pass the th1 , in stead of r , then some time i'm getting dead lock condition. –  Krushna Jun 30 '12 at 14:08
    
@KrushnaCh.Dash: please see my answer, passing thread instance to another thread is wrong. –  Denis Tulskiy Jun 30 '12 at 14:53

You want the incrementing of i to be synchronized, i.e.

public class Ex13 implements Runnable {
    int i=0;
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Running "+ increment());
    }
    private synchronized int increment() {
        return ++i;
    }
}

The Java Tutorial has a very nice explanation of this given a very similar scenario. The problem is that incrementing a variable is not an atomic operation. Each thread needs to read the current state of i before setting it to the new value. Restricting access to incrementing the variable to one thread at a time assures you will get consistent behavior.

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To see whats happening in the System.out.println you can also print the thread name:

Thread t = Thread.currentThread();
String name = t.getName();
System.out.println("name=" + name);

I see you call the two threads with the same runnable object, so they will both use the same "i" variable, in order for you to get Running 1 Running 2 you need to synchronize "i"

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