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I have a text file which contains some lines as the following:

ASDASD2W 3ASGDD12 SDADFDFDDFDD W11 ACC=PNO23 DFSAEFEA EAEDEWRESAD ASSDRE 
AERREEW2 3122312 SDADDSADADAD W12 ACC=HH34 23SAEFEA EAEDEWRESAD ASEEWEE 
A15ECCCW 3XCXXF12 SDSGTRERRECC W43 ACC=P11 XXFSAEFEA EAEDEWRESAD ASWWWW 
ASDASD2W 3122312 SDAFFFDEEEEE SD3 ACC=PNI22 ABCEFEA EAEDEWRESAD ASWEDSSAD 
...

I have to extract the substring between the '=' character and the following blank space for each line , i.e.

PNO23
HH34
P11
PNI22

I've been using the sed command but cannot figure out how to ignore all characters following the blank space.

Any help?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use the right tool for the job.

$ awk -F '[= ]+' '{ print $6 }' input.txt
PNO23
HH34
P11
PNI22
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Doubtless awk is a powerful tool and your code will help me a lot but i'm just curious about achieving the same result with sed even if it were harder. –  user1492786 Jun 30 '12 at 10:16
    
Using sed is certainly not harder in this case. "The right tool for the right job" is just wrong in this context. Sed is the right tool. Awk is better for tabular data and quick hacks and calculations. Sed makes regular expressions easy and is more declarative. See my answer. –  Jo So Jun 30 '12 at 11:13
    
@JoSo Sed grammar may make it easier to use regular expressions than awk in some situations, but this is not one of them. –  William Pursell Jun 30 '12 at 16:54
    
@WilliamPursell: Please explain. I think s/.*=//; s/ .*// is dead simple. –  Jo So Jun 30 '12 at 23:50
    
@JoSo Although s/.*=//; s/ .*// is simple, [= ]+ is much simpler. –  William Pursell Jul 1 '12 at 18:33

Sorry, but have to add another one because I feel the existing answers are just to complicated

sed 's/.*=//; s/ .*//;' inputfile
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This might work for you:

sed -n 's/.*=\([^ ]*\).*/\1/p' file

or, if you prefer:

sed 's/.*=\([^ ]*\).*/\1/p;d' file
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Put the string you want to capture in a backreference:

sed 's/.*=\([^ =]*\) .*/\1/'

or do the substitution piecemeal;

sed -e 's/.*=//' -e 's/ .*//'
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sed 's/[^=]*=\([^ ]*\) .*/\1/' inputfile

Match all the non-equal-sign characters and an equal sign. Capture a sequence of non-space characters. Match a space and the rest of the line. Substitute the captured string.

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