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I want to write an XNA game using .NET 4.5, so that I can use one of the new features that isn't in .NET 4.0.

Is there any way to do this? VS2012 doesn't have XNA listed anywhere in the list of New Projects.

I have also seen this question: How to install XNA game studio on Visual Studio 2012 RC?

But I'm only a hobbyist and I couldn't get xcopy to work (plus I don't think I have the game studio, only the framework). I was wondering if it was possible to instead target .NET 4.5 in VS2010, anyway.

Thanks in advance.

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2  
No, you'd better write this off as an option until the Xbox and Phone specific runtimes catch up. If ever. –  Hans Passant Jun 30 '12 at 11:12
1  
Most news looks like XNA won't catch the train to Windows 8-- MS is pushing C/C++ for Windows Phone 8 and presumably Windows 8 as well. You may want to look into alternatives like Monogame and SharpDX. –  A-Type Jul 2 '12 at 13:16
    
Which feature are you trying to use? There might be a library add-on that enables something similar. –  Robert Gawdzik Jul 20 '12 at 15:06
    
@A-Type This is the option I'd use. The develop3D branch of the MonoDevelop project has a W8 port in an advanced state of completion. –  ananthonline Jul 20 '12 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What platform(s) are you targeting with your game?

I ask because it looks like XNA may be dying off. The project was not terribly successful as Xbox Live Indie Games, nor was it terribly popular for their Windows Phone, Zune (Defunct), or PC targeting.

It has already been stated that XNA would not be compatible with the Windows 8 Metro UI, meaning that you won't be able to target any phone, tablet or other device using an ARM processor, effectively limiting you to the desktop.

Given that XNA isn't being supported for Windows 8, I'd be surprised if it was supported for Microsoft's next-generation Xbox console, which we are all but certain to see within the next two years.

The only place it still might make sense to use XNA is to target the Xbox360, and in that case you are almost completely limited to the XNA framework itself.

It really wouldn't make sense to try and use .NET 4.5 specific features in an XNA game/application. In fact, at this stage I'd argue that it wouldn't make sense to use XNA at all.

If, however, you are targeting the PC platform specifically, you could use the tweak linked to achieve the desired result... but for the various reasons I've mentioned I hope you don't. You're going to have VS2010 installed anyways, so there's no point in risking compatibility for using features that, from my point of view, won't offer any benefit.

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Some have been successful using MonoGame on Win8+Metro.

http://monogame.codeplex.com/

As stated in the other answer, XNA isn't being supported on Metro on its own, but MonoGame gives you the majority of the APIs. You should be able to just add a reference to the DLL and write your app as an XNA Game.

In answer to your other question, I think MS has said that VS2010 won't support .Net 4.5 development.

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You can change the project file of a XNA game to let it use .Net 4.5. Open the .csproj file and change the following lines:

<TargetFrameworkVersion>v4.0</TargetFrameworkVersion>
<TargetFrameworkProfile>Client</TargetFrameworkProfile>

to read:

<TargetFrameworkVersion>v4.5</TargetFrameworkVersion>

and on the next compile the binary is .Net 4.5. At our company we use it to create XNA games with the new Kinect One and it works splendidly. We tried MonoGame and although its great it was not as stable as we hoped on Windows in our specific case.

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Thanks it works. –  ali Mar 27 at 11:19

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