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Till now, for clear understanding I was thinking this always refers to owner of the function.

There were mainly three cases I considered.

  1. instance methods, this is the instance calling the method.
  2. event handler, element is owner of function on which event is getting called.
  3. function in the global namespace, window is owner of the function

But what happens when I create a inner function and call that function right there. Even in that case this refers to window.

function outer(){
    var inner = (function(){
        console.log(this);
    })
    inner();
}

outer();

Can anybody explain why this refers to window in simple terms.

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3  
inner() is just a function call without context. this defaults to window (undefined in strict mode). –  Rob W Jun 30 '12 at 10:42
    
What exactly do you want this to refer to in your example? –  panda-34 Jun 30 '12 at 10:45
    
I just suspected a problem with my understanding in this case, so just wanted to clear it up. –  Vishwanath Jun 30 '12 at 10:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're thinking in OO terms, but the code you posted is not OO. As Rob W said in his post, the default this is window or undefined in strict mode.

this only changes value where a particular function or situation contextually supplies it with one.

Where functions are used in class simulations, i.e. instantiated (via new) rather than simply invoked, this points to the instance as you'd expect.

function Dog(name) {
    this.name = name;
    alert(name);
}
var fido = new Dog('Fido'); //alerts 'Fido'

Other situations that provide a context for this include event handlers (at least in the addEventListener model, not older IEs) and any time you use call() or apply() and manually set the this context yourself.

Also, don't think of this as pointing to the function 'owner' in JavaScript. In an event, this points to the affected element, but it wouldn't be helpful to think of that element as 'owning' the callback function - it is merely running in the context of that element.

Finally, as Quentin mentioned, there is no way to reference an outer context of this. You would have to cache it in a variable first.

function Dog() {
    var that = this;
    setTimeout(function() {
        alert(this); //window - setTimeout() has overwritten the 'this' context
        alert(that); //we reference our cached, outer context
    }, 500);
}
var fido = new Dog('Fido');
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So, In simple terms I can say this is context in which function is running, and everything I mentioned becomes context and in case of inner function there is no context so it defaults to window.. I guess that cleared it up.. Thanks. –  Vishwanath Jun 30 '12 at 10:58
    
It's not a hard-and-fast rule that an inner function has no context. Each function's context depends entirely on how it's called, and the outer context it's running in. As a general rule, the context is window (or undefined) unless you're working with instantiation, object methods, event callbacks, bind(), call(), apply() or any library API method that allows the stipulation of context (though these merely delegate to call() or apply() behind the scenes). –  Utkanos Jun 30 '12 at 11:21
    
Hmm.. got it. I was talking about the case I mentioned when I said there is no context. Understood that it can be assigned by means of mentioned ways like call, apply and bind. –  Vishwanath Jun 30 '12 at 13:15
    
Your inner function's context is window/undefined because, unless it explicitly sets a new context, it inherits from the outer function's context, which in your case is also window/undefined. –  Utkanos Jun 30 '12 at 13:25

this (in the absence of new, bind, call or apply magic) refers to the object in which the function was called.

If there is no object, then the default object is used. For web browsers, that object is window.

// all comments apply to "inside the body of the bar function"
foo.bar();     // this is foo
foo.baz.bar(); // this is baz
bar();         // this is window

You can copy the value of this to another variable that exists in the scope of the function you are calling.

function outer(){
    var that = this;
    var inner = (function(){
        console.log(that);
    })
    inner();
}

outer();

… and you can change the value of this using various methods.

function outer(){
    var inner = (function(){
        console.log(this);
    })
    inner.apply(this);
}

outer();
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1  
Don't forget about .bind() :) –  Rob W Jun 30 '12 at 10:46

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