Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have below java code.

List<SomePojo> list = new ArrayList<SomePojo>();
//add 100 SomePojo objects to list.

Now list has 100 objects.

If i create one more instance as below:

List<SomePojo> anotherList = new ArrayList<SomePojo>();
anotherList .addAll(list);

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Mind that I rolled back the original question, because your edits missed the whole point of the question itself. –  Luca Geretti Jun 30 '12 at 11:16
1  
The issue is that this is no longer a question, and does not make any sense at all ;) –  Thomas Clowes Dec 3 '14 at 11:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

An object is only once in memory. Your first addition to list just adds the object references.

anotherList.addAll will also just add the references. So still only 100 objects in memory.

If you change list by adding/removing elements, anotherList won't be changed. But if you change any object in list, then it's content will be also changed, when accessing it from anotherList, because the same reference is being pointed to from both lists.

share|improve this answer

100, it will hold the same references. Therefore if you make a change to a specific object in the list, it will affect the same object in anotherList.

Adding or removing objects in any of the list will not affect the other.

list and anotherList are two different instances, they only hold the same references of the objects "inside" them.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for ur reply. if i add/remove any object in list, does same change is reflected to otherlist? –  user1016403 Jun 30 '12 at 10:52
2  
no it won't affect. list and anotherList are two different instances, they only hold the same references of the objects "inside" them. –  Joset Jun 30 '12 at 10:54

Citing the official javadoc of List.addAll:

Appends all of the elements in the specified collection to the end of
this list, in the order that they are returned by the specified
collection's iterator (optional operation).  The behavior of this
operation is undefined if the specified collection is modified while
the operation is in progress.  (Note that this will occur if the
specified collection is this list, and it's nonempty.)

So you will copy the references of the objects in list to anotherList. Any method that does not operate on the referenced objects of anotherList (such as removal, addition, sorting) is local to it, and therefore will not influence list.

share|improve this answer

Excerpt from the Java API for addAll(collection c) in Interface List see here

"Appends all of the elements in the specified collection to the end of this list, in the order that they are returned by the specified collection's iterator (optional operation)."

You you will have as much object as you have in both lists - the number of objects in your first list plus the number of objects you have in your second list - in your case 100.

share|improve this answer

no... Once u have executed the statement anotherList.addAll(list) and after that if u change some list data it does not carry to another list

share|improve this answer
    
your answer is ambiguous. –  Joset Jun 30 '12 at 11:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.