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I have the following piece of code from a function that takes the host name as input and supposed to extract the certificate for that host. I need to display the IP address for the remote host. I used ".getInetAdress()" to return the IP for the remote host: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/net/Socket.html#getInetAddress().

SSLSocketFactory factory = HttpsURLConnection.getDefaultSSLSocketFactory();

System.out.println("Starting SSL Socket For "+hostname+" port "+port);
SSLSocket socket = (SSLSocket) factory.createSocket(hostname, port);

//To get the IP for the remote host. Format: (domain name/IP), 
//then manually covert it to string

String remoteIP=socket.getInetAddress().toString();
System.out.println("Remote address = " + remoteIP);

socket.startHandshake();     
Certificate[] serverCerts = socket.getSession().getPeerCertificates();

When I run the program, for example, the host is: "www.tesco.com", the ".getInetAddress()." returns this IP to me: 88.221.94.232. When I try to type this IP in the browser, it gives me "Invalid URL", even after adding 'https://' to the URL. While, if I tried to ping "tesco.com" I get another IP: "212.140.185.177" and if I typed it in the browser, it opens tesco's web page.

What am I misunderstanding ? Is there any other methods other than getInetAddress & getHostAddress() to get the IP address for a remote host (without using socket)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are getting the correct IP address.

When I run the program, for example, the host is: "www.tesco.com", the ".getInetAddress()." returns this IP to me: 88.221.94.232.

Right. So that's the IP address you got for www.tesco.com.

When I try to type this IP in the browser, it gives me "Invalid URL".

Because that server (an Akamai accelerator) has no idea which web site you want.

While, if I tried to ping "tesco.com" I get another IP: "212.140.185.177"

Right, because tesco.com is not the same as www.tesco.com.

and if I typed it in the browser, it opens tesco's web page.

Because that web server did know which web site you wanted because it only handles tesco.com, unlike the servers that handle www.tesco.com that handle many web sites.

If you look closely, you'll see that pointing your browser at tesco.com redirects you to www.tesco.com. They use Akamai.

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So, to make sure I got you right, this means "88.221.94.232" is a hosting server that host many sites not only tesco. That brings another question to my mind, if I want to extract certificate for SSL enabled servers (the servers that provide users with certificates to ensure secure communications during a transaction, like tesco and amazon etc), that means, I create my socket (refer to my code for more info) with: "tesco.com" not "www.tesco.com" ?? –  Jury A Jun 30 '12 at 11:10
    
Also, if possible plz, I need general answer not only my tesco example for: what host name should I use to extract certificates ? Is it with www. or without ? –  Jury A Jun 30 '12 at 11:15
    
Yes, it's a hosting server (actually, it's way more than one, it's Akamai. They have servers all over the world.). If you want the certificate for the web site "tesco.com", then use tesco.com. If you want the certificate for the web site "www.tesco.com", then use www.tesco.com. Web sites are the things that have certificates -- use the site whose certificate you want. –  David Schwartz Jun 30 '12 at 11:16
    
I want the certificate for the site that the regular buyers or users communicate with to purchase online, so this means I extract certificate for: tesco.com ? Sorry for this, but it is essential to differentiate. –  Jury A Jun 30 '12 at 11:33
    
You say "the site", but which site? If by "the site", you mean "tesco.com", then the answer is "tesco.com". If by "the site", you mean "www.tesco.com", then the answer is "www.tesco.com". Use the name of the site whose certificate you want. You might as well ask whether you should get the certificate of "amazon.com" or "microsoft.com". Get the certificate of the site whose certificate you want. (If you know what certificate you want but not which site, you can try multiple sites until you find the certificate you are looking for.) –  David Schwartz Jun 30 '12 at 19:39

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