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I was looking at this code of a sieve of eratosthenes but i still couldn't get how the "i" variable gets incremented since I have a limited knowledge about lambda expressions and the documentation didn't help me much. Can anyone explain ?

int cur = 1, total = 1000;
var pc = Enumerable.Range(2, total).ToList();

while(cur <= Math.Sqrt(total))
{
    cur = pc.First(i => i > cur);
    pc.RemoveAll(i => i != cur && i % cur == 0);
}

Console.WriteLine(pc.Max()); 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's not actually incremented; in both lambda expressions in this code i is used as a temporary placeholder for a currently processed value(s). Namely,

cur = pc.First(i => i > cur);

means "Take first value that is greater than cur from pc and assign it to cur".

pc.RemoveAll(i => i != cur && i % cur == 0);

means "Take all values that are not equal to cur and have zero reminder from division by cur and remove them from pc".

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So correct me if I am wrong ... During the first iteration, the first value of i will be 2? –  Priyank Kapadia Jun 30 '12 at 13:40
    
Yes, you're correct. –  Sergey Kudriavtsev Jun 30 '12 at 20:48

Its not i but cur variable which is controlling when to exit loop

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The variable cur is updated in the while loop:

cur = pc.First(i => i > cur); 

i is simply part of the predicate which returns the first occurance where i > cur. In other words, it's a local variable in these cases.

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It doesn't get incremented, it's relying on on pc having members removed until the while condition is not met.

Think of it like the difference between

index = 1000;
while (index > 0)
{
    pc.Remove(index);
    index--;
}

and

while (pc.Count > 0)
{
   pc.Remove(0);
}
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