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I want to see if I have repeated items in my array, there are over 16.000 so will automate it There may be other ways but I started with this and, well, would like to finish it unless there is a straightforward command. What I am doing is shifting and pushing from one array into another and this way, check the destination array to see if it is "in array" (like there is such a command in PHP).

So, I got this sub routine and it works with literals, but it doesn't with variables. It is because of the 'eq' or whatever I should need. The 'sourcefile' will contain one or more of the words of the destination array.

// Here I just fetch my file


    $listamails = <STDIN>;
    # Remove the newlines filename
    chomp $listamails;
    # open the file, or exit
    unless ( open(MAILS, $listamails) ) {

    print "Cannot open file \"$listamails\"\n\n";
    exit;
    }
    # Read the list of mails from the file, and store it
    # into the array variable @sourcefile
    @sourcefile = <MAILS>;
    # Close the handle - we've read all the data into @sourcefile now.
    close MAILS;


    my @destination = ('hi', 'bye');

    sub in_array
    {
       my ($destination,$search_for) = @_;
       return grep {$search_for eq $_} @$destination;
    }

    for($i = 0; $i <=100; $i ++)

    {
      $elemento = shift @sourcefile;
      if(in_array(\@destination, $elemento))
      {
        print  "it is";
      }
      else
      {
        print "it aint there";
      }
    }

Well, if instead of including the $elemento in there I put a 'hi' it does work and also I have printed the value of $elemento which is also 'hi', but when I put the variable, it does not work, and that is because of the 'eq', but I don't know what else to put. If I put == it complains that 'hi' is not a numeric value.

share|improve this question
    
A couple of side-bugs: $i < scalar @sourcefile -1 shouldn't have the -1 at the end, and can in fact become just $i < @sourcefile since the scalar context on the right-hand side of < will automatically Do What You Mean here. Also @sourcefile is shrinking by 1 each iteration due to the shift, so your current for loop condition will wind up looking at only half the elements! Either replace the shift with a read of $sourcefile[$i] and leave the for condition as $i < @sourcefile, or change the for condition to @sourcefile > 0 or just @sourcefile. –  j_random_hacker Jun 30 '12 at 13:28
    
yes, yes, realized that before that it was actually shrinking at twice the speed because of that, fixed it elsewhere and forgot to copy it here, anyway I can change the for without a problem, but still I have the core issue.. thank you –  iaintunderstand Jun 30 '12 at 13:33
    
If @sourcefile contains lines read from a file, the most likely problem is that they will end with a newline (\n) character (or possibly a carriage-return, newline sequence (\r\n) if you're reading a file that was created in Windows under UNIX. You can get rid of a trailing \n with chomp. To get rid of a trailing \r, I use s/\r\z//;. –  j_random_hacker Jun 30 '12 at 13:38
    
So you mean, the grep command is correct? it should work as it is ? –  iaintunderstand Jun 30 '12 at 13:41
    
I suspect there could be spaces or other unseen characters hiding in there. I would recommend installing a module called Data::Dump, adding use Data::Dump 'pp'; near the top of your program, and then adding print pp($elemento); in your code to rule this out. –  j_random_hacker Jun 30 '12 at 13:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

By the way, when looking for duplicates in a large number of items, it's much faster to use a strategy based on sorting. After sorting the items, all duplicates will be right next to each other, so to tell if something is a duplicate, all you have to do is compare it with the previous one:

@sorted = sort @sourcefile;
for (my $i = 1; $i < @sorted; ++$i) {   # Start at 1 because we'll check the previous one
    print "$sorted[$i] is a duplicate!\n" if $sorted[$i] eq $sorted[$i - 1];
}

This will print multiple dupe messages if there are multiple dupes, but you can clean it up.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, yes, definitively that should work, I ll give you the useful help. I will keep it in the pocket as a solution. Now I think I have only left the curiosity of knowing whether the 'eq' should work with the variable $elemento. (could remove all lines except the first one so as to eliminate the sure carriage return and new lines. –  iaintunderstand Jun 30 '12 at 13:48
    
This is true in the general case for most programming languages, but hash-based solutions tend to be faster in Perl than sorting-based ones on large data sets because hash operations are O(1), while sorting is (at best) O(log n). –  Dave Sherohman Jun 30 '12 at 15:02
1  
@Dave: I agree with you except for large datasets ;) Hashes are fast until you run out of memory, at which point they become abysmally slow, while sorting (admittedly external sorting, not Perl's internal sort()) can be done fast in external memory. –  j_random_hacker Jun 30 '12 at 15:07
1  
Fair point. I was assuming datasets which are large, but not too large to fit into memory. Although I wonder how a tied/DBM hash would stack up against an external sort in that case... (Not to mention that it's now getting to be large enough that an SQL database might be more appropriate in any case.) –  Dave Sherohman Jun 30 '12 at 15:15
    
What you say isn't true. Sorting is not faster, especially for large number of items. A linear search assisted with a hash is faster. say "$_ is a duplicate" for grep ++$seen{$_} >= 2, @sourcefile; And it's even easy to avoid dupliacte messages (by changing >= to ==). –  ikegami Jul 1 '12 at 18:48

When you want distinct values think hash.

my %seen;
@seen{ @array } = (); 

if (keys %seen == @array) {
    print "\@array has no duplicate values\n";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Just to clarify how this works, if (keys %seen == @array) tests to see whether the number or items in %seen and @array are the same. It does not compare the actual items in each list against the other list. In this case, that will work perfectly, but it is not a general-purpose way of determining equality between two lists. (I assume you know this eugene, but it should be noted for the sake of those less familiar with Perl.) –  Dave Sherohman Jun 30 '12 at 15:00

It's not clear what you want. If your first sentence is the only one that matters ("I want to see if I have repeated items in my array"), then you could use:

my %seen;
if (grep ++$seen{$_} >= 2, @array) {
   say "Has duplicates";
}

You said you have a large array, so it might be faster to stop as soon as you find a duplicate.

my %seen;
for (@array) {
   if (++$seen{$_} == 2) {
      say "Has duplicates";
      last;
   }
}
share|improve this answer

As eugene y said, hashes are definitely the way to go here. Here's a direct translation of the code you posted to a hash-based method (with a little more Perlishness added along the way):

my @destination = ('hi', 'bye');
my %in_array = map { $_ => 1 } @destination;

for my $i (0 .. 100) {
  $elemento = shift @sourcefile;
  if(exists $in_array{$elemento})
  {
    print  "it is";
  }
  else
  {
    print "it aint there";
  }
}

Also, if you mean to check all elements of @sourcefile (as opposed to testing the first 101 elements) against @destination, you should replace the for line with

while (@sourcefile) {

Also also, don't forget to chomp any values read from a file! Lines read from a file have a linebreak at the end of them (the \r\n or \n mentioned in comments on the initial question), which will cause both eq and hash lookups to report that otherwise-matching values are different. This is, most likely, the reason why your code is failing to work correctly in the first place and changing to use sort or hashes won't fix that. First chomp your input to make it work, then use sort or hashes to make it efficient.

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