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I want to write a module (framework specific), that would wrap and extend Facebook PHP-sdk (https://github.com/facebook/php-sdk/). My problem is - how to organize classes, in a nice way.

So getting into details - Facebook PHP-sdk consists of two classes:

  • BaseFacebook - abstract class with all the stuff sdk does
  • Facebook - extends BaseFacebook, and implements parent abstract persistance-related methods with default session usage

Now I have some functionality to add:

  • Facebook class substitution, integrated with framework session class
  • shorthand methods, that run api calls, I use mostly (through BaseFacebook::api()),
  • authorization methods, so i don't have to rewrite this logic every time,
  • configuration, sucked up from framework classes, insted of passed as params
  • caching, integrated with framework cache module

I know something has gone very wrong, because I have too much inheritance that doesn't look very normal. Wrapping everything in one "complex extension" class also seems too much. I think I should have few working togheter classes - but i get into problems like: if cache class doesn't really extend and override BaseFacebook::api() method - shorthand and authentication classes won't be able to use the caching.

Maybe some kind of a pattern would be right in here? How would you organize these classes and their dependencies?

EDIT 04.07.2012

Bits of code, related to the topic:

This is how the base class of Facebook PHP-sdk:

abstract class BaseFacebook {

    // ... some methods

    public function api(/* polymorphic */) 
    {
        // ... method, that makes api calls
    }

    public function getUser()
    {
        // ... tries to get user id from session
    }

    // ... other methods

    abstract protected function setPersistentData($key, $value);

    abstract protected function getPersistentData($key, $default = false);

    // ... few more abstract methods

}

Normaly Facebook class extends it, and impelements those abstract methods. I replaced it with my substitude - Facebook_Session class:

class Facebook_Session extends BaseFacebook {

    protected function setPersistentData($key, $value)
    {
        // ... method body
    }

    protected function getPersistentData($key, $default = false)
    {
        // ... method body
    }

    // ... implementation of other abstract functions from BaseFacebook
}

Ok, then I extend this more with shorthand methods and configuration variables:

class Facebook_Custom extends Facebook_Session {

    public function __construct()
    {
        // ... call parent's constructor with parameters from framework config
    }

    public function api_batch()
    {
        // ... a wrapper for parent's api() method
        return $this->api('/?batch=' . json_encode($calls), 'POST');
    }

    public function redirect_to_auth_dialog()
    {
        // method body
    }

    // ... more methods like this, for common queries / authorization

}

I'm not sure, if this isn't too much for a single class ( authorization / shorthand methods / configuration). Then there comes another extending layer - cache:

class Facebook_Cache extends Facebook_Custom {

    public function api()
    {
        $cache_file_identifier = $this->getUser();

        if(/* cache_file_identifier is not null
              and found a valid file with cached query result */)
        {
            // return the result
        }
        else
        {
            try {
                // call Facebook_Custom::api, cache and return the result
            } catch(FacebookApiException $e) {
                // if Access Token is expired force refreshing it
                parent::redirect_to_auth_dialog();
            }
        }

    }

    // .. some other stuff related to caching

}

Now this pretty much works. New instance of Facebook_Cache gives me all the functionality. Shorthand methods from Facebook_Custom use caching, because Facebook_Cache overwrited api() method. But here is what is bothering me:

  • I think it's too much inheritance.
  • It's all very tight coupled - like look how i had to specify 'Facebook_Custom::api' instead of 'parent:api', to avoid api() method loop on Facebook_Cache class extending.
  • Overall mess and ugliness.

So again, this works but I'm just asking about patterns / ways of doing this in a cleaner and smarter way.

share|improve this question
    
please provide some more details to get more near to solution.. –  Rajesh Rolen- DotNet Developer Jun 30 '12 at 17:07
    
I have added code bits, sory that it took so long. –  Luigi Jul 4 '12 at 23:03
3  
By the way; multiple inheritance is one class extending more than one other class. That's something completely different. –  Sherlock Jul 11 '12 at 7:47
    
Looks like I've used wrong term. Title changed. –  Luigi Jul 12 '12 at 15:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

Auxiliary features such as caching are usually implemented as a decorator (which I see you already mentioned in another comment). Decorators work best with interfaces, so I would begin by creating one:

interface FacebookService {
  public function api();
  public function getUser();
}

Keep it simple, don't add anything you don't need externally (such as setPersistentData). Then wrap the existing BaseFacebook class in your new interface:

class FacebookAdapter implements FacebookService {
  private $fb;

  function __construct(BaseFacebook $fb) {
    $this->fb = $fb;
  }

  public function api() {
    // retain variable arguments
    return call_user_func_array(array($fb, 'api'), func_get_args());
  }

  public function getUser() {
    return $fb->getUser();
  }
}

Now it's easy to write a caching decorator:

class CachingFacebookService implements FacebookService {
  private $fb;

  function __construct(FacebookService $fb) {
    $this->fb = $fb;
  }

  public function api() {
    // put caching logic here and maybe call $fb->api
  }

  public function getUser() {
    return $fb->getUser();
  }
}

And then:

$baseFb = new Facebook_Session();
$fb = new FacebookAdapter($baseFb);
$cachingFb = new CachingFacebookService($fb);

Both $fb and $cachingFb expose the same FacebookService interface -- so you can choose whether you want caching or not, and the rest of the code won't change at all.

As for your Facebook_Custom class, it is just a bunch of helper methods right now; you should factor it into one or more independent classes that wrap FacebookService and provide specific functionality. Some example use cases:

$x = new FacebookAuthWrapper($fb);
$x->redirect_to_auth_dialog();

$x = new FacebookBatchWrapper($fb);
$x->api_batch(...);
share|improve this answer
    
more comprehensive and well managed, thanks for the post. –  Rupesh Patel Jul 16 '12 at 7:13
    
What if some of the Services need more functions than api() and getUser() from BaseFacebook ? The Interface should have more functions? Maybe use _call? But then there is really no need for interface, and a Service could get both BaseFacebook descendent or another service... –  Luigi Jul 22 '12 at 10:49
    
@Luigi: You can add them to the interface if you need to. I would stay away from magic methods like __call because they make it easy to break OO design. –  casablanca Jul 22 '12 at 18:18

I have done some thing like that for yahoo sdk let me put it, give it a try :)

Lets assume Facebook is the class in sdk you are using for all end method calls. You can create a new class(as your frame work allows) and assign a variable of the class to the instance of the Facebook Class .

Use __call() for all methods of Facebook and put your custome ones in the wrapper class. for all undefined methods it wrapper it will go to Facebook Class and there is no inheritance involved at all. It worked for me . Hope it helps :)

  Class MyWrapper
    {
       protected $facebook;
       public function __construct()
       {
          $this->facebook = new FaceBook();
       }

       public function __call($method,$args)
       {
          return $this->facebook->$method($args);
       }

       ///define  Your methods //////////

      ///////////////////////////////////
    }

    $t = new MyWrap;
    $t->api(); // Whatever !!!!

edited :

You don't need to create multiple wrapper for more than one classes following can be done,you just need to take care at the method call time, have to suffix the variable name holding instance of the wrapped class.

 Class MyWrapper
    {
       protected $facebook;
       protected $facebookCache;
       public function __construct()
       {
          $this->facebook = new FaceBook();
          $this->facebookCache = new FacebookCache();
       }

       public function __call($method,$args)
       {
          $method = explode('_',$method);
          $instance_name = $method[0];
          $method_name = $method[1];
          return $this->$instance_name->$method_name($args);
       }

       ///define  Your methods //////////

      ///////////////////////////////////
    }

    $t = new MyWrap;
    $t->facebook_api(); // Whatever !!!!
    $t->facebookCache_cache();
share|improve this answer
1  
I've beed thinking about this last evening. I guess this is called the 'Decorator pattern'. This is nice, however I still doubt about one thing. I need to have few wrappers like that. Like one for caching, one for shorhand methods, one for authorization. Now how could I use multiple decorators in a gentle way? A separate class for loading a combination of them (strategy pattern / fascade) ? Maybe do you have an idea? –  Luigi Jul 12 '12 at 15:13
    
I have edited my answer, hope it will help please check :) –  Rupesh Patel Jul 14 '12 at 9:07
    
After edit the API of MyWrapper class is comprehensive, but now FacebookCache both can't use directly Facebook class and would require additnioal conditions/hardocding for cooperation with MyWrapper methods. I Like your first example better. I could add a constructor param and use it like so: $fb = new Facebook(); $fbCache = new FacebookCache($fb); $shorthand = new FacebookShorthand($fbCache); $shorthandNoCache FacebookShorthand($fb); etc. So - loose coupling. Shorhand class can use caching without knowing it. I'll accept your answer if nothing better occurs before bounty time ends :). Thx. –  Luigi Jul 14 '12 at 13:23

It is indeed too much inheritance. Looks like a job for Facade design pattern. Use composition instead of inheritance to have more flexibility. Delegate any methods you use to appropriate objects.

For example if any of the underlying classes changes, you can just change your methods to adapt to the changes, and you won't have to worry about overriding any of the parent methods.

Generally yes, it is not a good idea to assign multiple responsibilities to one class. Here, the responsibility of the class would be to represent an external API.

share|improve this answer

i think repository design pattern will be better in this situation. although i am not from php but as per oops it should solve your issue..

share|improve this answer

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