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Given the following class:

public class GenClass<T>
{
     private List<T> ItemsList {get;set;}
     public Predicate<T> SomeCondition {get;set;}
     public bool UsePredicate {get;set;}

     public List<T> Items
     {
         get { //CODE Goes here; }
     }
}

I need a way for the list to use the SomeConditionPredicate and return only the items than match the condition, but only if the bool UsePredicate is true. I know I can just use LINQ for this, the problem is that everytime I query with LINQ I get a different instance of an IEnumerable, and this needs to be a property, therefore I need to be able to access the same instance of the List from outside the class, because I will be adding and removing items from it, and I cannot do that with the result of a .Where, for example. I was thinking of a custom IList<T>, but I'm not really sure how to do that.

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1  
How about making the Enumerable member as static? – Siva Gopal Jun 30 '12 at 15:34
    
So why is getting a different IEnumerable a problem? – MBen Jun 30 '12 at 15:38
    
Its a problem because If I do GenClass.Items.Add(xxx) from outside the class, the new item is never added to the real List, because GenClass.Items is not the List itself, but a different IEnumerable returned by LinQ. – HighCore Jun 30 '12 at 16:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a conceptual problem here. If it is the same instance, how is it supposed to filter by the condition? The reason why LINQ returns a new enumeration on every call is that it runs the query "live", and multiple queries have to be independent.

That said, you probably shouldn't have to rely on the property returning the same reference each time. If you rely on the instance being the same, what do you expect to happen when/if someone changes the predicate?

And how is adding or removing items supposed to work/act on a filtered list? If you add an item that would be filtered out, what happens?

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1  
You're Right. I have not thought of that. Should use methods to add new items to the collection? If I add an item that does not match the condition, I need the item to be part of the inner ItemsList anyway, because when I turn off the UsePredicate flag I need all the items to be returned. – HighCore Jun 30 '12 at 16:03

Your question is a little unclear, but let's start with this:

public class GenClass<T>
{
     private List<T> ItemsList {get;set;}
     public Predicate<T> SomeCondition {get;set;}
     public bool UsePredicate {get;set;}

     public List<T> Items
     {
         get { return UsePredicate 
                   ? ItemsList.Where(SomeCondition).ToList() 
                   : ItemsList; }
     }
}

What about that doesn't work for your use case?

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An IEnumerable can only be used to read the collection, but not to make changes to it. If you want to make changes to it, return an enumeration of filtered indexes instead.

public IEnumerable<int> FilteredIndexes
{
    get
    {
        if (UsePredicate) {
            return ItemsList
                .Select((item, i) => i)
                .Where(i => SomeCondition(ItemsList[i]));
        }
        return ItemsList.Select((item, i) => i);
    }
}

Assuming that you have declared this indexer

public T this[int index]
{
    get { return ItemsList[index]; }
    set { ItemsList[index] = value; }
}

You can now use the collection like this

GenClass<string> stringCollection = new GenClass<string>();
//TODO: Add items
stringCollection.SomeCondition = s => s.StartsWith("A");
stringCollection.UsePredicate = true;
foreach (int index in stringCollection.FilteredIndexes) {
    stringCollection[index] = stringCollection[index] + " starts with 'A'";
}

UPDATE

If you do not want to expose the indexes, you could create a class used as item accessor representing your collection items

public class Item<T>
{
    private List<T> _items;
    private int _index;

    public Item(List<T> items, int index)
    {
        _items = items;
        _index = index;
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get { return _items[_index]; }
        set { _items[_index] = value; }
    }
}

In your collection you would declare this property

public IEnumerable<Item<T>> FilteredItems
{
    get
    {
        if (UsePredicate) {
            return ItemsList
                .Select((item, i) => new Item<T>(ItemsList, i))
                .Where(item => SomeCondition(item.Value));
        }
        return ItemsList.Select((item, i) => new Item<T>(ItemsList, i));
    }
}

Now you can use the collection like this

foreach (Item<string> item in stringCollection.FilteredItems) {
    item.Value = item.Value + " starts with 'A'";
}

A general note: You can safely turn the private properties into fields. Properties are normally used as an intermediate to publicly expose field values.

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