Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to create a class that use a different base class depending on some condition. With some classes I get the infamous:

TypeError: metaclass conflict: the metaclass of a derived class must be a (non-strict) subclass of the metaclasses of all its bases

One example is sqlite3, here is a short example you can even use in the interpreter:

>>> import sqlite3
>>> x = type('x', (sqlite3,), {})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: metaclass conflict: the metaclass of a derived class must be a (non-strict) subclass of the metaclasses of all its bases
>>> 

How can I solve this issue?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
sqlite3 is a module not a "class". –  agf Jun 30 '12 at 17:20
    
@agf: I was just looking at this and realized the same thing when you posted that. –  jdi Jun 30 '12 at 17:25
    
Thanks agf, you're right! sqlite3.Connection makes it work. –  Yves Dorfsman Jun 30 '12 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

Even though your example using sqlite3 is invalid, because its actually a module and not a class, I have encountered this same issue. The base class has a metaclass of a different type that the subclass, and then you see this error.

I ended up using a variation of this activestate snippet using noconflict.py. This is not python 3.x compatible unfortunately. It gives you the idea, but the snippet would have to be reworked.

Problem snippet

class M_A(type):
    pass
class M_B(type):
    pass
class A(object):
    __metaclass__=M_A
class B(object):
    __metaclass__=M_B
class C(A,B):
    pass

#Traceback (most recent call last):
#  File "<stdin>", line 1, in ?
#TypeError: metaclass conflict: the metaclass of a derived class must be a (non-strict) subclass #of the metaclasses of all its bases

Solution snippet

from noconflict import classmaker
class C(A,B):
    __metaclass__=classmaker()

print C
#<class 'C'>

The code recipe properly resolves the metaclasses for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Python 3 uses the class C(metaclass=MyMeta): syntax –  JBernardo Jun 30 '12 at 17:36
    
@JBernardo: Thanks. I commented on it not being py3 compat. It has a few other issues in the snippet that make it not work as well. –  jdi Jun 30 '12 at 17:46

Instead of using the receipe as mentioned by jdi, you can directly use:

class M_C(M_A, M_B):
    pass

class C(A, B):
    __metaclass__ = M_C
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.