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This is a question that came to mind while reading the brilliant answer by Mysticial to this question.

Context for the types involved:

const unsigned arraySize = 32768;
int data[arraySize];
long long sum = 0;

In his answer he explains that the Intel Compiler (ICC) optimizes this:

for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
        if (data[c] >= 128)
            sum += data[c];

...into something equivalent to this:

for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    if (data[c] >= 128)
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
            sum += data[c];

The optimizer is recognizing that these are equivalent and is therefore exchanging the loops, moving the branch outside the inner loop. Very clever!

But why doesn't it do this?

for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    if (data[c] >= 128)
        sum += 100000 * data[c];

Hopefully Mysticial (or anyone else) can give an equally brilliant answer. I've never learned about the optimizations discussed in that other question before, so I'm really grateful for this.

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8  
That's something that probably only Intel knows. I don't know what order it runs its optimization passes. And apparently, it does not run a loop-collapsing pass after loop-interchange. –  Mysticial Jun 30 '12 at 18:02
3  
This optimization is only valid if the values contained in the data array are immutable. For instance, if the are memory mapped to an input/output device each time you read data[0] will produce a different value... –  Thomas C. G. de Vilhena Jun 30 '12 at 18:02
1  
What data type is this, integer or floating-point? Repeated addition in floating-point gives very different results from multiplication. –  Ben Voigt Jun 30 '12 at 18:02
1  
Perhaps their optimization passes are in a (for this situation) unfortunate order. –  harold Jun 30 '12 at 18:04
2  
I think 100000 * data[c] should read 100000LL * data[c] otherwise you can get an int overflow when computing the intermediate result. –  Anonymous Jun 30 '12 at 19:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

The compiler can't generally transform

for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    if (data[c] >= 128)
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
            sum += data[c];

into

for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    if (data[c] >= 128)
        sum += 100000 * data[c];

because the latter could lead to overflow of signed integers where the former doesn't. Even with guaranteed wrap-around behaviour for overflow of signed two's complement integers, it would change the result (if data[c] is 30000, the product would become -1294967296 for the typical 32-bit ints with wrap around, while 100000 times adding 30000 to sum would, if that doesn't overflow, increase sum by 3000000000). Note that the same holds for unsigned quantities, with different numbers, overflow of 100000 * data[c] would typically introduce a reduction modulo 2^32 that must not appear in the final result.

It could transform it into

for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    if (data[c] >= 128)
        sum += 100000LL * data[c];  // resp. 100000ull

though, if, as usual, long long is sufficiently larger than int.

Why it doesn't do that, I can't tell, I guess it's what Mysticial said, "apparently, it does not run a loop-collapsing pass after loop-interchange".

Note that the loop-interchange itself is not generally valid (for signed integers), since

for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    if (condition(data[c]))
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
            sum += data[c];

can lead to overflow where

for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
        if (condition(data[c]))
            sum += data[c];

wouldn't. It's kosher here, since the condition ensures all data[c] that are added have the same sign, so if one overflows, both do.

I wouldn't be too sure that the compiler took that into account, though (@Mysticial, could you try with a condition like data[c] & 0x80 or so that can be true for positive and negative values?). I had compilers make invalid optimisations (for example, a couple of years ago, I had an ICC (11.0, iirc) use signed-32-bit-int-to-double conversion in 1.0/n where n was an unsigned int. Was about twice as fast as gcc's output. But wrong, a lot of values were larger than 2^31, oops.).

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I remember a version of MPW compiler which added an option to allow stack frames larger than 32K [earlier versions were limited using @A7+int16 addressing for local variables]. It got everything right for stack frames below 32K or over 64K, but for a 40K stack frame it would use ADD.W A6,$A000, forgetting that word operations with address registers sign-extend the word to 32 bits before the add. Took awhile to troubleshoot, since the only thing the code did between that ADD and the next time it popped A6 off the stack was to restore caller's registers it has saved to that frame... –  supercat Apr 3 '13 at 16:46
    
...and the only register the caller happened to care about was the [load-time constant] address of a static array. The compiler knew that the address of the array was saved in a register so it could optimize based upon that, but the debugger simply knew the address of a constant. Thus, before a statement MyArray[0] = 4; I could check the adddress of MyArray, and look at that location before and after the statement executed; it wouldn't change. Code was something like move.B @A3,#4 and A3 was supposed to always point to MyArray any time that instruction executed, but it didn't. Fun. –  supercat Apr 3 '13 at 16:51

This answer does not apply to the specific case linked, but it does apply to the question title, and may be interesting to future readers:

Due to finite precision, repeated floating-point addition is not equivalent to multiplication. Consider:

float const step = 1e-15;
float const init = 1;
long int const count = 1000000000;

float result1 = init;
for( int i = 0; i < count; ++i ) result1 += step;

float result2 = init;
result2 += step * count;

cout << (result1 - result2);

Demo: http://ideone.com/7RhfP

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2  
This is no answer to the asked question. Despite interesting information (and a must know for any C/C++ programmer), this is no forum, and doesn't belong here. –  nightcracker Jun 30 '12 at 18:11
6  
@nightcracker: The stated goal of StackOverflow is to build a searchable library of answers useful to future users. And this is an answer to the question asked... it just so happens that there is some unstated information that makes this answer not apply for the original poster. It may still apply for others with the same question. –  Ben Voigt Jun 30 '12 at 18:14
3  
It's could be an answer to the question title, but not the question, no. –  nightcracker Jun 30 '12 at 18:15
2  
As I said, it is interesting information. Yet it still seems wrong to me that nota bene the top answer of the question does not answer the question as it stands, now. This simply is not the reason the Intel Compiler decided not to optimize, basta. –  nightcracker Jun 30 '12 at 18:21
2  
@ThiefMaster: The asker has expressed that he's interested in the behavior of floating-point as well as integer, therefore this answer was helpful (even if not 100% complete). Plus there is no way to write a correct answer to the question as it currently exists. –  Ben Voigt Jun 30 '12 at 22:56

The compiler contains various passes which does the optimization. Usually in each pass either an optimization on statements or loop optimizations are done. At present there is no model which does an optimization of loop body based on the loop headers. This is hard to detect and less common.

The optimization which was done was loop invariant code motion. This can be done using a set of techniques.

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Well, I'd guess that some compilers might do this sort of optimization, assuming that we are talking about integer arithmetics.

At the same time, some compilers might refuse to do it because replacing repetitive addition with multiplication might change the overflow behavior of the code. For unsigned integral types it shouldn't make a difference, since their overflow behavior is fully specified by the language. But for signed ones it might (probably not on 2's complement platform though). It is true that signed overflow actually leads to undefined behavior in C, meaning that it should be perfectly OK to ignore that overflow semantics altogether, bit not all compilers are brave enough to do that. It often draws a lot of criticism from the "C is just a higher-level assembly language" crowd. (Remember what happened when GCC introduced optimizations based on strict-aliasing semantics?)

Historically, GCC has shown itself as a compiler that has what it takes to take such drastic steps, but other compilers might prefer to stick with the perceived "user-intended" behavior even if it is undefined by the language.

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I'd prefer to know if I'm accidentally depending on undefined behaviour, but I guess the compiler has no way to know as the overflow would be a run-time issue :/ –  jhabbott Jun 30 '12 at 18:14
1  
@jhabbott: iff the overflow occurs, then there is undefined behaviour. Whether the behavior is defined is unknown until runtime (assuming the numbers are input at runtime) :P. –  nightcracker Jun 30 '12 at 18:25

There's a conceptual barrier to this kind of optimization. Compiler authors spend a lot of effort on strength reduction -- for instance, replacing multiplications with adds and shifts. They get used to thinking that multiplies are bad. So a case where one ought to go the other way is surprising and counterintuitive. So nobody thinks to implement it.

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2  
Replacing a loop with a closed-form calculation is also strength reduction, isn't it? –  Ben Voigt Jun 30 '12 at 18:21
    
Formally, yes, I suppose, but I've never heard anyone talk about it that way. (I'm a bit out of date on the literature, though.) –  Zack Jun 30 '12 at 18:22

The people who develop and maintain compilers have a limited amount of time and energy to spend on their work, so they generally want to focus on what their users care about the most: turning well-written code into fast code. They don't want to spend their time trying to find ways to turn silly code into fast code—that's what code review is for. In a high-level language, there may be "silly" code that expresses an important idea, making it worth the developers' time to make that fast—for example, short cut deforestation and stream fusion allow Haskell programs structured around certain kinds of lazily produced data structures to be compiled into tight loops that don't allocate memory. But that sort of incentive simply does not apply to turning looped addition into multiplication. If you want it to be fast, just write it with multiplication.

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