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I know that with anonymous functions, local stack variables are promoted to a class, are now on the heap etc. So the following does not work:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace AnonymousFuncTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            foreach (var f in GetFuncs())
            {
                Console.WriteLine(f());
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        static IEnumerable<Func<int>> GetFuncs()
        {
            List<Func<int>> list = new List<Func<int>>();
            foreach(var i in Enumerable.Range(1, 20))
            {
                list.Add(delegate() { return i; });
            }

            return list;
        }
    }
}

I know changing GetFuncs to this would work:

    static IEnumerable<Func<int>> GetFuncs()
    {
        foreach(var i in Enumerable.Range(1, 20))
        {
            yield return () => i;
        }
    }

But say I'm doing something like the following:

            foreach (var arg in someArgList)
            {
                var item = new ToolStripMenuItem(arg.ToString());
                ritem.Click += delegate(object sender, EventArgs e)
                {
                    new Form(arg).Show();
                };
                mainMenu.DropDownItems.Add(ritem);
            }

This of course does not have the intended effect. I know why it doesn't work, just need suggestions on how to fix it so it does.

share|improve this question
    
This problem, that the closure captures the single iteration variable of the foreach, rather than capturing a different variable every time through the loop, is the number one most common "this code doesn't work like I expect it to" bug report that we get. We're considering taking the breaking change in a future version of the language and moving the iteration variable to logically inside the loop. If anyone knows of real-world code that would break because of such a change, please email it to me. There's a "contact me" link on my blog. Thanks! –  Eric Lippert Jul 14 '09 at 21:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You should change it like this:

    static IEnumerable<Func<int>> GetFuncs()
    {
        List<Func<int>> list = new List<Func<int>>();
        foreach (var i in Enumerable.Range(1, 20))
        {
            int i_local = i;
            list.Add(() => i_local);
        }

        return list;
    }

EDIT

Thanks to Jon Skeet, read his answer.

share|improve this answer

Just to elaborate on kek444's answer, the problem isn't that local variables are being captured - it's that the same local variable is being captured by all of your delegates.

Using a copy of the variable within the loop, a new variable is "instantiated" on each iteration of the loop, so each delegate captures a different variable. See my article on closures for more details.


An alternative approach:

For this particular situation, there's actually a nice alternative using LINQ:

static IEnumerable<Func<int>> GetFuncs()
{
    return Enumerable.Range(1, 20)
                     .Select(x => (Func<int>)(() => x))
                     .ToList();
}

If you want lazy evaluation, you can just drop the ToList() call.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the elaboration! I thought I'd just wait to see if a question arises in the comments. :) –  Kenan E. K. Jul 14 '09 at 20:07
    
Thank you Mr. Skeet, informative as always. Because ultimately I need the anonymous function as an event handler I will be going with the local variable route, can't use the LINQ alternative. –  Joseph Kingry Jul 14 '09 at 20:15
    
@Jon: Why the explicit Func<int> cast on the lambda within the Select? Shouldn't that be inferred? –  Janie Jul 14 '09 at 20:53
1  
@Janie: No, because Select could be projecting to anything. The type returned by Select is determined without looking at how the result is used. –  Jon Skeet Jul 14 '09 at 21:02

You can correctly capture the value of the loop variable by copying it to a loop local variable.

static IEnumerable<Func<Int32>> GetFuncs()
{
    List<Func<Int32>> list = new List<Func<Int32>>();

    foreach(Int32 i in Enumerable.Range(1, 20))
    {
        Int32 local_i = i;
        list.Add(delegate() { return local_i; });
    }

    return list;
}
share|improve this answer

A alternative way to express your last example:

foreach (var item in someArgList
              .Select( a => 
                      var i = new ToolStripMenuItem(a.ToString()); 
                      i.Click+= (sender, e) => new Form(a).Show();
                      return i;) 
        )
{
    mainMenu.DropDownItems.Add(item);
}

The fix for a bad closure/capture in a foreach loop is usually a call to .Select().

share|improve this answer

This works:

List<Func<int>> list = new List<Func<int>>();        
Enumerable.Range(1, 20).ToList().ForEach(i => {
    list.Add(delegate() { return i; });            
});

So does this:

Action action;
List<Action> objects = new List<Action>();
var items = new string [] { "whatever", "something" };
items.ToList().ForEach((arg) => {   
    action = () => Console.WriteLine(arg.ToString());	
    objects.Add(action);
});
objects[0]();  // prints whatever
objects[1](); // prints something
share|improve this answer

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