Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was aware that the Count() method supplied by LINQ had an optimization whereby it would check whether the source sequence implemented ICollection<T> and if so call the Count property rather than iterating over the entire collection. When this optimization is used, the underlying IEnumerable<T> is not consumed, so it can be consumed by other calls succeeding Count().

Notably, the overload of Count which accepts a predicate performs no such optimization because it must inspect the value of each element.

Now consider the following complete program:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace count_where_issue
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            IEnumerable<int> items = new List<int> {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};
            IEnumerable<int> evens = items.Where(y => y % 2 == 0);
            int count = evens.Count();
            int first = evens.First();
            Console.WriteLine("count = {0}", count);
            Console.WriteLine("first = {0}", first);
        }
    }
}

which prints,

count = 3
first = 2

My expectation was the Count would need to consume the whole evens sequence returned by Where() and the subsequent call to evens.First() would fail with InvalidOperationException because the sequence would contain no elements.

Why does this program work the way it does? I would not normally attempt to use an IEnumerable<T> following a call to `Count(). Would it be unwise to rely on this behaviour?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is the IEnumerator<T> you would not be able to use. However, Count and First each create a separate enumerator (via calls to GetEnumerator on the IEnumerable<T>).

share|improve this answer
1  
Presumably, this is only effective because the ultimate source of the data - the List - can be iterated over more than once. –  Rob Smallshire Jun 30 '12 at 18:15
add comment

I don't know if this is what you mean, but evens.Count() and evens.First() both enumerate the items.Where(...).

You can see this in the output of the following:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IEnumerable<int> items = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
        IEnumerable<int> evens = items.Where(y => isEven(y));

        int count = evens.Count();
        Console.WriteLine("count = {0}", count);

        int first = evens.First();
        Console.WriteLine("first = {0}", first);

    }

    private static bool isEven(int y)
    {
        Console.Write(y + ": ");

        bool result = y % 2 == 0;

        Console.WriteLine(result);    
        return result;
    }
}

Which is:

1: False
2: True
3: False
4: True
5: False
6: True
count = 3
1: False
2: True
first = 2
share|improve this answer
add comment

Whatever gave you the impression that Count() affects the original IEnumerable in any way?

The docs don't mention anything of the sort...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb338038.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
I got the impression from reading Jon Skeet's blog posts on the workings of LINQ - particularly this article: msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2010/12/26/… –  Rob Smallshire Jun 30 '12 at 18:12
    
Skeet says so? Oh... the docs must be wrong ;) –  demoncodemonkey Jul 2 '12 at 16:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.