Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've got an IntPtr marshaled across an unmanaged/managed boundary that corresponds to an Icon Handle. Converting it to an Icon is trivial via the FromHandle() method, and this was satisfactory until recently.

Basically, I've got enough thread weirdness going on now that the MTA/STA dance I've been playing to keep a hosted WinForm from breaking the primary (WPF-tastic) UI of the application is too brittle to stick with. So the WinForm has got to go.

So, how can I get an ImageSource version of an Icon?

Note, I've tried ImageSourceConverter to no avail.

As an aside, I can get the underlying resource for some but not all of the icons involved and they generally exist outside of my application's assembly (in fact, they often exist in unmanaged dll's).

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Try this:

Icon img;

Bitmap bitmap = img.ToBitmap();
IntPtr hBitmap = bitmap.GetHbitmap();

ImageSource wpfBitmap =
     Imaging.CreateBitmapSourceFromHBitmap(
          hBitmap, IntPtr.Zero, Int32Rect.Empty, 
          BitmapSizeOptions.FromEmptyOptions());

UPDATE: Incorporating Alex's suggestion and making it an extension method:

internal static class IconUtilities
{
    [DllImport("gdi32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern bool DeleteObject(IntPtr hObject);

    public static ImageSource ToImageSource(this Icon icon)
    {            
        Bitmap bitmap = icon.ToBitmap();
        IntPtr hBitmap = bitmap.GetHbitmap();

        ImageSource wpfBitmap = Imaging.CreateBitmapSourceFromHBitmap(
            hBitmap,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            Int32Rect.Empty,
            BitmapSizeOptions.FromEmptyOptions());

        if (!DeleteObject(hBitmap))
        {
            throw new Win32Exception();
        }

        return wpfBitmap;
    }
}

Then you can do:

ImageSource wpfBitmap = img.ToImageSource();
share|improve this answer
2  
After doing this conversion, you should use the DeleteObject( IntPtr hObject ) call in gdi32.dll on the hBitmap to avoid a memory leak. –  Alex Feb 5 '10 at 14:43
    
Even the updated solution might be causing the "Parameter is not valid" issue blog.lavablast.com/post/2007/11/… in some certain situations, I'd need to investigate more though. It might be safer to use Darren's solution instead –  Jeff Moser Apr 28 '10 at 14:59

Simple conversion method without creating any extra objects:

    public static ImageSource ToImageSource(this Icon icon)
    {
        ImageSource imageSource = Imaging.CreateBitmapSourceFromHIcon(
            icon.Handle,
            Int32Rect.Empty,
            BitmapSizeOptions.FromEmptyOptions());

        return imageSource;
    }
share|improve this answer
6  
This solution seems more elegant than the one using Imaging.CreateBitmapSourceFromHBitmap. There's no need to create an unmanaged bitmap (and then have to remember to dispose of it) when Imaging can create the BitmapSource from the Icon handle directly. –  Richard Walters Oct 19 '11 at 18:40
MemoryStream iconStream = new MemoryStream();
myForm.Icon.Save(iconStream);
iconStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
_wpfForm.Icon = System.Windows.Media.Imaging.BitmapFrame.Create(iconStream);
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice to stay all in easy managed code. –  user166390 Apr 11 '10 at 4:17
1  
Do you need to dispose of the MemoryStream? –  devios Jul 28 '10 at 1:27
1  
+1 for all managed code. –  Cameron Peters Apr 29 '11 at 2:24
    
should use Dispose on stream and for some reason this gives me very low quality, black and white images. anyone else has this problem? –  Patrick Klug May 3 '11 at 1:18
1  
@Patrick, I also had issues using a MemoryStream and getting very low quality output. I used this solution by Byte (from below). –  Jon Peterson Aug 6 '13 at 20:52

When using disposable streams it is almost always recommended to use 'using' blocks to force correct releasing of resources.

using (MemoryStream iconStream = new MemoryStream())
{
   icon.Save(iconStream);
   iconStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

   this.TargetWindow.Icon = System.Windows.Media.Imaging.BitmapFrame.Create(iconStream);
}

Where icon is the source System.Drawing.Icon, and this.TargetWindow is the target System.Windows.Window.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.