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Suppose I have a large list of words. For an example:

>>> with open('/usr/share/dict/words') as f:
...     words=[word for word in f.read().split('\n') if word]

If I wanted to build an index by first letter of this word list, this is easy:

d={}
for word in words:
   if word[0].lower() in 'aeiou':
       d.setdefault(word[0].lower(),[]).append(word)
       # You could use defaultdict here too...

Results in something like this:

{'a':[list of 'a' words], 'e':[list of 'e' words], 'i': etc...}

Is there a way to do this with Python 2.7, 3+ dict comprehension? In other words, is it possible with the dict comprehension syntax to append the list represented by the key as the dict is being built?

ie:

  index={k[0].lower():XXX for k in words if k[0].lower() in 'aeiou'}

Where XXX performs an append operation or list creation for the key as index is being created.

Edit

Taking the suggestions and benchmarking:

def f1():   
    d={}
    for word in words:
        c=word[0].lower()
        if c in 'aeiou':
           d.setdefault(c,[]).append(word)

def f2():
   d={}
   {d.setdefault(word[0].lower(),[]).append(word) for word in words 
        if word[0].lower() in 'aeiou'} 

def f3():
    d=defaultdict(list)                       
    {d[word[0].lower()].append(word) for word in words 
            if word[0].lower() in 'aeiou'}         

def f4():
    d=functools.reduce(lambda d, w: d.setdefault(w[0], []).append(w[1]) or d,
       ((w[0].lower(), w) for w in words
        if w[0].lower() in 'aeiou'), {}) 

def f5():   
    d=defaultdict(list)
    for word in words:
        c=word[0].lower() 
        if c in 'aeiou':
            d[c].append(word)       

Produces this benchmark:

   rate/sec    f4     f2     f1     f3     f5
f4       11    -- -21.8% -31.1% -31.2% -41.2%
f2       14 27.8%     -- -11.9% -12.1% -24.8%
f1       16 45.1%  13.5%     --  -0.2% -14.7%
f3       16 45.4%  13.8%   0.2%     -- -14.5%
f5       18 70.0%  33.0%  17.2%  16.9%     --

The straight loop with a default dict is fastest followed by set comprehension and loop with setdefault.

Thanks for the ideas!

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1  
Unless you are code-golfing please do not write unreadable code for the sake of brevity. Readability counts. –  ThiefMaster Jun 30 '12 at 18:26
1  
{w[0]:[ww for ww in words if ww.startswith(w[0])] for w in words} –  astynax Jun 30 '12 at 18:54
    
@astynax: Clever, but really slow –  Pyson Jun 30 '12 at 18:58
1  
setdefault is better, of course, but that is dict comprehension :) –  astynax Jun 30 '12 at 19:01
1  
reduce(lambda d, w: d.setdefault(w[0], []).append(w) or d, words, {}), but this is not a dict comprehension :) –  astynax Jun 30 '12 at 19:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is not possible (at least easily or directly) with a dict comprehension.

It is possible, but potentially abusive of the syntax, with a set or list comprehension:

# your code:    
d={}
for word in words:
   if word[0].lower() in 'aeiou':
       d.setdefault(word[0].lower(),[]).append(word)        

# a side effect set comprehension:  
index={}   
r={index.setdefault(word[0].lower(),[]).append(word) for word in words 
        if word[0].lower() in 'aeiou'}     

print r
print [(k, len(d[k])) for k in sorted(d.keys())]  
print [(k, len(index[k])) for k in sorted(index.keys())]

Prints:

set([None])
[('a', 17094), ('e', 8734), ('i', 8797), ('o', 7847), ('u', 16385)]
[('a', 17094), ('e', 8734), ('i', 8797), ('o', 7847), ('u', 16385)]

The set comprehension produces a set with the results of the setdefault() method after iterating over the words list. The sum total of set([None]) in this case. It also produces your desired side effect of producing your dict of lists.

It is not as readable (IMHO) as the straight looping construct and should be avoided (IMHO). It is no shorter and probably not materially faster. This is more interesting trivia about Python than useful -- IMHO... Maybe to win a bet?

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Thanks for showing me exactly why I should not be doing this! –  thnee Jan 16 '14 at 8:40

No - dict comprehensions are designed to generate non-overlapping keys with each iteration; they don't support aggregation. For this particular use case, a loop is the proper way to accomplish the task efficiently (in linear time).

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i'd use filter:

>>> words=['abcd','abdef','eft','egg','uck','ice']
>>> index={k.lower():list(filter(lambda x:x[0].lower()==k.lower(),words)) for k in 'aeiou'}
>>> index
{'a': ['abcd', 'abdef'], 'i': ['ice'], 'e': ['eft', 'egg'], 'u': ['uck'], 'o': []}
share|improve this answer
    
This will break if words is an iterator. –  Amber Jun 30 '12 at 18:24
1  
but OP is taking about a list of words, which is an iterable. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 30 '12 at 18:26
    
Sure - but there are other downsides to this approach as well (e.g. quintupling the time it takes to run - depending on how big the input is, constant factors are sometimes noticeable. It's also less readable than just using a for loop. –  Amber Jun 30 '12 at 18:27
    
I agree, for loops are always good when it comes to readability. And yes this approach is a bit expensive as well O(len('aeiou')*len(words)). –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 30 '12 at 18:34

This is not exactly a dict comprehension, but:

reduce(lambda d, w: d.setdefault(w[0], []).append(w[1]) or d,
       ((w[0].lower(), w) for w in words
        if w[0].lower() in 'aeiou'), {})
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