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I think I understand the new "value class" feature of Scala 2.10, by comparison with Haskell's newtype:

trait BoundedValue[+This] extends Any { this: This =>

  def upperBound: This

  def lowerBound: This

}

class Probability @throws(classOf[IllegalArgumentException]) (v: Double) extends AnyVal with BoundedValue[Probability] {

  val value: Double = if ((v >= 0.0) && (v <= 1.0)) v else throw new IllegalArgumentException((v.toString) + "is not within the range [0.0, 1.0]")

  override val upperBound: Probability = new Probability(0.0)

  override val lowerBound: Probability = new Probability(1.0)

  // Implement probability arithmetic here;
  // will be represented by Double at runtime.

}

The question I have is, how does a value class appear to Java code that uses the Scala package in which it is declared? Does the value class appear as a reference class from the Java side, or is it erased completely (and thus appears as the type it wraps)? In other words, how type-safe are value classes when Java is involved on the source level?


EDIT

The code above won't compile, according to the SIP-15 document (linked in Daniel's answer), because value classes aren't allowed to have any initialization logic, because either v must be explicitly a val or Probability must have an unbox method and a corresponding box method on it's companion object, and because value classes must have exactly one field. The correct code is:

trait BoundedValue[This <: BoundedValue[This]] extends Any { this: This =>

  def upperBound: This

  def lowerBound: This

}

class Probability private[Probability] (value: Double) extends AnyVal with BoundedValue[Probability] {

  @inline override def upperBound: Probability = new Probability(0.0)

  @inline override def lowerBound: Probability = new Probability(1.0)

  @inline def unbox: Double = value

  // Implement probability arithmetic here;
  // will be represented by Double at runtime (mostly).

}

object Probability {

  @throws(classOf[IllegalArgumentException])
  def box(v: Double): Probability = if ((v >= 0.0) && (v <= 1.0)) new Probability(v) else throw new IllegalArgumentException((v.toString) + "is not within the range [0.0, 1.0]")

}

The question itself is still valid as is, however.

share|improve this question
1  
In your test program, were you able to push the wrapped value outside the valid bounds from Java? –  David Harkness Jun 30 '12 at 19:57
    
@DavidHarkness I don't have access to a machine with 2.10.0-M4 on it right now, so I don't know. I'll check when I can. –  Ptharien's Flame Jun 30 '12 at 20:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Value classes compile as normal classes, and may well appear as references.

The magic in them is that, when the value class doesn't escape the scope, all traces of it are erased from code, effectively inlining all the code. And, of course, giving additional type safety.

See also SIP-15, which explains the mechanics.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I thought I had read the SIP, but I guess I hadn't. –  Ptharien's Flame Jul 1 '12 at 4:12
2  
An equally interesting question as "how are Scala value types encoded on a platform that doesn't have value types itself (e.g. JVM)" is "how are Scala value types encoded on a platform that does have value types itself (e.g. CLI)". For example, can Scala value types by compiled to structs on the CLI? Is it guaranteed that they will always be compiled to structs? –  Jörg W Mittag Jul 1 '12 at 9:24
1  
Your question is very interesting, but I realized that not only CLI structs are not supported (they were not mentioned in the SIP, last time I read it), but they're probably also useless. Value classes can only have a single field, as Haskell's newtypes, hence I think using structs and not primitives would not help. Structs have a lot of advantages for memory usage—but to use them, one should provide a separate mechanism, that is an annotation requesting this behavior which can be ignored. The semantic problem is that structs should probably inherit from AnyVal only on the CLI, not on the JVM. –  Blaisorblade Jul 2 '12 at 2:39
2  
It's incorrect, as far as I've understood, that a value class that escapes the scope will be boxed (I mean, that the value would be wrapped in an object, rather than inlined). In fact, the value is inlined "almost always" :-) See answers to my question In these cases, the Scala value class will be “boxed”, right? –  KajMagnus Apr 7 '13 at 21:51

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