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I have a list (simplified)

[Kind]      [Name]
null        E
null        W
4           T
5           G
6           Q
null        L
null        V
7           K
2           Z
0           F

I need {E,L} -> Items where their Kind==null and the next Kind==null too

Assume that there is an ID that is increasing and in order.

Is this forward looking possible in Linq?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Like this?

void Main()
{
    List<SomeClass> list = new List<SomeClass>() {
        new SomeClass() { Kind = null, Name = "E" },
        new SomeClass() { Kind = null, Name = "W" },
        new SomeClass() { Kind = 4, Name = "T" },
        new SomeClass() { Kind = 5, Name = "G" },
        ...
    };

    var query = list.Where ((s, i) =>
        !s.Kind.HasValue &&
        list.ElementAtOrDefault(i + 1) != null &&
        !list.ElementAt(i + 1).Kind.HasValue);
}

public class SomeClass
{
    public int? Kind { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Edit: Stealing @Jeff Marcado's solution to implement an extension method similar to the above use but a bit cleaner and not making you deal with the index:

public static IEnumerable<TSource> WhereWithLookahead<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TSource, bool> predicate) where TSource : class
{
    using(var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            //empty
            yield break;
        }

        var current = enumerator.Current;
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            var next = enumerator.Current;

            if(predicate(current, next))
            {
                yield return current;
            }

            current = next;
        }

        if (predicate(current, null))
        {
            yield return current;
        }

    }
}

// Use:
var query2 = list.WhereWithLookahead((current, next) =>
    !current.Kind.HasValue &&
    (next != null) &&
    next.Kind.HasValue);
share|improve this answer
2  
I see an index out of range exception in your solution: if the last item Kind is null then list[i + 1] will overindexing the list. –  nemesv Jun 30 '12 at 19:20
    
Edited: Good call. –  Ocelot20 Jun 30 '12 at 19:22
    
Still not perfect: replace i with i+1 in ElementAtOrDefault and ElementAt to make it right. –  nemesv Jun 30 '12 at 19:35
    
While this solution works, I'm not sure about its efficiency. Both the ElementAtOrDefault and ElementAt calls will iterate through the list again (O(n) each and not O(1)), making this take more time than it should. If performance is an issue, I'd avoid using LINQ in this situation and go with a more standard approach. –  Adi Lester Jun 30 '12 at 21:11
    
@Lester: The ElementAt and ElementAtOrDefault methods iterate the all the elements only if it does not implement IList<T>. If they implement the IList<T> interface, then the item will be returned in constant time (O(1)). –  Alex Essilfie Jun 30 '12 at 22:05

For a functional approach, you can implement a lookahead enumerator like so:

IEnumerable<Item> collection = ...;
var lookahead = collection.Zip(collection.Skip(1), Tuple.Create);

The enumerator will iterate through tuples of each item and it's following item. This excludes the last item in the collection. Then it's just a matter of performing the query.

var query = collection.Zip(collection.Skip(1), Tuple.Create)
    .Where(tuple => tuple.Item1.Kind == null && tuple.Item2.Kind == null)
    .Select(tuple => tuple.Item1);

Unfortunately this will be very inefficient. You're enumerating the length of the collection twice and can be very expensive.

It would be better to write your own enumerator for this so you only go through the collection in one pass:

public static IEnumerable<TResult> LookAhead<TSource, TResult>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
    Func<TSource, TSource, TResult> selector)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArugmentNullException("source");
    if (selector == null) throw new ArugmentNullException("selector");

    using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            //empty
            yield break;
        }
        var current = enumerator.Current;
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            var next = enumerator.Current;
            yield return selector(current, next);
            current = next;
        }
    }
}

Then the query becomes:

var query = collection.LookAhead(Tuple.Create)
    .Where(tuple => tuple.Item1.Kind == null && tuple.Item2.Kind == null)
    .Select(tuple => tuple.Item1);
share|improve this answer
    
Cool. Hope you don't mind I stole some of the general idea here to update my answer :) –  Ocelot20 Jul 1 '12 at 1:31

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