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The function is used to validate the input. It prompts the user for a numeric value (great or equal to 0 ) until it meets the coditions. if any character input precedes or follows the number, the input is to be treated as invalid.The required output is:

Enter a positive numeric number: -500
Error! Please enter a positive number:45abc
Error! Please enter a number:abc45
Error! Please enter a number:abc45abc
Error! Please enter a number:1800

Well, it seems easy:

#include <stdio.h>
main() {
    int ret=0;
    double num;
    printf("Enter a positive number:");
    ret = scanf("%.2lf",&num);

    while (num <0 ) {
        if (ret!=1){
            while(getchar()!= '\n');
            printf("Error!Please enter a number:");
        }
        else{
            printf("Error!Please enter a positive number:");
        }
        ret = scanf("%.2lf",&num);
    }
}

however, my code keeps put out Error!Please enter a number: regardless types of input. Any advice?

share|improve this question
    
Remove the stray semicolon at the end of the 'while' line. –  reuben Jun 30 '12 at 21:06
1  
Output the values of ret and num after each scanf call. See if they're what you expect. –  David Schwartz Jun 30 '12 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you'll have problems doing the validation you want using just scanf(). You'll do better to first scan in a string and then convert it to a numeric. But scanf() is dangerous for scanning in char strings, since its input length is not limited and you have to provide it a pointer to a finite-length input buffer. Better to use fgets(), which allows you to limit the input buffer length.

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    double num=-1;
    char input[80]; // arbitrary size buffer
    char* cp, badc; // badc is for detecting extraneous chars in the input
    int n;
    printf("Enter a positive number:");
    while (num < 0)
    {
        cp = fgets(input, sizeof(input), stdin);
        if (cp == input)
        {
            n = sscanf(input, "%lf %c", &num, &badc);
            if (n != 1) // if badc captured an extraneous char
            {
                printf("Error! Please enter a number:");
                num = -1;
            }
            else if (num < 0)
                printf("Error! Please enter a POSITIVE number:");
        }
    }

    printf("num = %f\n", num);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
WOW, this is so cool. The output is exactly what is required. but I am so sorry I started learning C less than 2 months ago and I understand only very basic functions,thus I can not use the code (this is an assignment for my C course :p). However I will learn all the above things later so I have kept it in my file. Thanks a lot~~ –  Hella Jul 2 '12 at 1:11
    
I tried to replace sscanf with scanf that we have learned, but after I enter the first data (such as "1800"), it stayed there for my second entry which is not what is required.Thinking hard.... –  Hella Jul 2 '12 at 1:36
    
@Hella - Hmmm. If you're posting a question for homework, you're supposed to select the 'Homework' tag also, so that folks know not to answer with a solution, but instead give you hints/suggestions on how one might go about solving such a problem. So I guess it's best that you can't use my solution anyway. Have you learned strtol() or strtod()? Maybe you could read into a char string using scanf("%s",...) and then convert the resulting string into a number with strtol()/strtod(). You can use the 'endptr' returned via strtoX()'s second parameter to help detect errors (extraneous chars). –  phonetagger Jul 2 '12 at 5:11
    
...Just remember that scanf("%s",...) is dangerous because there's no way to make it limit the length of the string that it writes to your buffer, and there's no way to make your buffer auto-sized to the input because the buffer has to be already-allocated when you call scanf(). So using scanf("%s",...) would be a horrible solution for a real-world project. But maybe it's ok for a beginner project. –  phonetagger Jul 2 '12 at 5:17
    
ok, I will remember your advice even though I am not into scanf("%s",...) and I will try to find the 'Homework' tag next time. Sorry it was my first post and I was in a hurry thus did not get time to browse over your website...I will later when I have finished my assignment. This code is just a small part of the assignment(one of 6 functions to write exclusive of main) so I still have plenty of things to do... –  Hella Jul 2 '12 at 17:09

A precision modifier isn't valid in scanf. You can easily verify this by enabling all compiler warnings (-Wall in gcc). The reason for this is that there is more then one way to actually enter real values, for example you can either use 0.2 or 2e-1.

Just use scanf("%lf",&num) and round the number afterwards if you need only 2 digits. Note that precision modifiers are fine in printf:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int ret = 0;
    double num = -1;
    printf("Enter a positive number:");
    ret = scanf("%lf",&num);

    while (num < 0 ) {
        if (ret != 1){
            while(getchar() != '\n');
            printf("Error! Please enter a number: ");
        }
        else{
            printf("Error! Please enter a positive number: ");
        }
        ret = scanf("%lf",&num);
    }
    printf("Your number is %.2lf",num);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for cplusplus. It is known to contain errors. Even in this case, the page for scanf doesn't list %p as acceptable specifier, for example. –  user283145 Jul 2 '12 at 0:16
    
great source code but cant handle character strings starting with numbers such as "45abc",which is accepted as "45". Have to figure out other ways~~~Thanks anyway! –  Hella Jul 2 '12 at 1:16
    
absolutely, we have to use "%lf" for double number input format, or any data will be treated as negative. I learned only today by running the code. Thanks for the confirmation^_^ –  Hella Jul 2 '12 at 2:59
    
@jons34yp: Well, please provide another source and I'll be happy to edit my answer. –  Zeta Jul 2 '12 at 16:19
    
here is the code I just developed which displays exact required output. Very basic function used only.I am happy I made it! thanks to phonetagger for editing and advice, and I appreciate the input from jons34yp and Zeta. Hope to talk to you later online^_^ –  Hella Jul 2 '12 at 16:58

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