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I've always wondered is there a better way that I should be writing some of my procedures, particularly ones that take a long time to finish.

I have always run everything off the Main GUI Thread which I now understand and realise is bad because it will make the Application unresponsive, Application.ProcessMessages will not really help here.

This makes me think I need to use TThreads for lengthy operations such as copying a file for example. This is also made me wonder how some Applications give you full control, eg allow you to pause, resume and or stop the operation.

I have about 3 lengthy operations in a personal project I am working on which I display a dialog form with a TProgressBar on. Whilst this does work, I feel it could be done much better. These progress dialogs could be shown for such a long time that you may want to cancel the operation and instead finish the job later.

As I said, currently I am running of the Main Gui Thread, do I instead need to use TThreads? I am not sure how or where to start implementing them as I have not worked with them before. If I do need threads do they offer what I need such as pausing, resuming, stopping an operation etc?

Basically I am looking for a better way of handling and managing lengthy operations.

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6  
You need to signal to the thread that you want to pause or cancel. And the thread must check for that signal. –  David Heffernan Jun 30 '12 at 21:54
    
or you can suspend and then resume it. A signal like a global var is better and more organized. You could also use Mutex as a signal... –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 30 '12 at 22:04
4  
@Benjamin Suspend and Resume? Not really. Those Windows functions should not be used. –  David Heffernan Jun 30 '12 at 22:09
7  
@BenjaminWeiss Not so. TThread.Suspend: Pauses a running thread. Suspend was intended to be used by debuggers and is deprecated in RAD Studio XE, in the year 2010. The only way to do this reliably is to get the thread to check regularly for a pause or cancel signal. –  David Heffernan Jun 30 '12 at 22:14
5  
@Benjamin Then read the documentation for SuspendThread. It says the same. Think about it. How do you suppose TThread.Suspend is implemented? Go on, take a wild guess at which Windows API is called. –  David Heffernan Jun 30 '12 at 22:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Yes, this is definitely a case where you need a thread to do the task.

A little example how to pause/resume a thread and cancel the thread.

Progress is sent to the main thread through a PostMessage call. The pause/resume and cancel are made with TSimpleEvent signals.

Edit: As per the comments from @mghie, here is a more complete example:

Edit 2: Showing how to pass a procedure for the thread to call for the heavy work.

Edit 3: Added some more features and a test unit.

unit WorkerThread;

interface

uses Windows, Classes, SyncObjs;

type
  TWorkFunction = function: boolean of object;

  TWorkerThread = Class(TThread)
  private
    FCancelFlag: TSimpleEvent;
    FDoWorkFlag: TSimpleEvent;
    FOwnerFormHandle: HWND;
    FWorkFunc: TWorkFunction; // Function method to call
    FCallbackMsg: integer; // PostMessage id
    FProgress: integer;
    procedure SetPaused(doPause: boolean);
    function GetPaused: boolean;
    procedure Execute; override;
  public
    Constructor Create(WindowHandle: HWND; callbackMsg: integer;
      myWorkFunc: TWorkFunction);
    Destructor Destroy; override;
    function StartNewWork(newWorkFunc: TWorkFunction): boolean;
    property Paused: boolean read GetPaused write SetPaused;
  end;

implementation

constructor TWorkerThread.Create(WindowHandle: HWND; callbackMsg: integer;
  myWorkFunc: TWorkFunction);
begin
  inherited Create(false);
  FOwnerFormHandle := WindowHandle;
  FDoWorkFlag := TSimpleEvent.Create;
  FCancelFlag := TSimpleEvent.Create;
  FWorkFunc := myWorkFunc;
  FCallbackMsg := callbackMsg;
  Self.FreeOnTerminate := false; // Main thread controls for thread destruction
  if Assigned(FWorkFunc) then
    FDoWorkFlag.SetEvent; // Activate work at start
end;

destructor TWorkerThread.Destroy; // Call MyWorkerThread.Free to cancel the thread
begin
  FDoWorkFlag.ResetEvent; // Stop ongoing work
  FCancelFlag.SetEvent; // Set cancel flag
  Waitfor; // Synchronize
  FCancelFlag.Free;
  FDoWorkFlag.Free;
  inherited;
end;

procedure TWorkerThread.SetPaused(doPause: boolean);
begin
  if doPause then
    FDoWorkFlag.ResetEvent
  else
    FDoWorkFlag.SetEvent;
end;

function TWorkerThread.StartNewWork(newWorkFunc: TWorkFunction): boolean;
begin
  Result := Self.Paused; // Must be paused !
  if Result then
  begin
    FWorkFunc := newWorkFunc;
    FProgress := 0; // Reset progress counter
    if Assigned(FWorkFunc) then
      FDoWorkFlag.SetEvent; // Start work
  end;
end;

procedure TWorkerThread.Execute;
{- PostMessage LParam:
  0 : Work in progress, progress counter in WParam
  1 : Work is ready
  2 : Thread is closing
}
var
  readyFlag: boolean;
  waitList: array [0 .. 1] of THandle;
begin
  FProgress := 0;
  waitList[0] := FDoWorkFlag.Handle;
  waitList[1] := FCancelFlag.Handle;
  while not Terminated do
  begin
    if (WaitForMultipleObjects(2, @waitList[0], false, INFINITE) <>
      WAIT_OBJECT_0) then
      break; // Terminate thread when FCancelFlag is signaled
    // Do some work
    readyFlag := FWorkFunc;
    if readyFlag then // work is done, pause thread
      Self.Paused := true;
    Inc(FProgress);
    // Inform main thread about progress
    PostMessage(FOwnerFormHandle, FCallbackMsg, WPARAM(FProgress),
      LPARAM(readyFlag));
  end;
  PostMessage(FOwnerFormHandle, FCallbackMsg, 0, LPARAM(2)); // Closing thread
end;

function TWorkerThread.GetPaused: boolean;
begin
  Result := (FDoWorkFlag.Waitfor(0) <> wrSignaled);
end;

end.

Just call MyThread.Paused := true to pause and MyThread.Paused := false to resume the thread operation.

To cancel the thread, call MyThread.Free.

To receive the posted messages from the thread, see following example:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants,
  System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics,
  Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, Vcl.StdCtrls, WorkerThread;

const
  WM_MyProgress = WM_USER + 0; // The unique message id

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Label1: TLabel;
    btnStartTask: TButton;
    btnPauseResume: TButton;
    btnCancelTask: TButton;
    Label2: TLabel;
    procedure btnStartTaskClick(Sender: TObject);
    procedure btnPauseResumeClick(Sender: TObject);
    procedure btnCancelTaskClick(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
    MyThread: TWorkerThread;
    workLoopIx: integer;

    function HeavyWork: boolean;
    procedure OnMyProgressMsg(var Msg: TMessage); message WM_MyProgress;
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

{ TForm1 }
const
  cWorkLoopMax = 500;

function TForm1.HeavyWork: boolean; // True when ready
var
  i, j: integer;
begin
  j := 0;
  for i := 0 to 10000000 do
    Inc(j);
  Inc(workLoopIx);
  Result := (workLoopIx >= cWorkLoopMax);
end;

procedure TForm1.btnStartTaskClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if not Assigned(MyThread) then
  begin
    workLoopIx := 0;
    btnStartTask.Enabled := false;
    btnPauseResume.Enabled := true;
    btnCancelTask.Enabled := true;
    MyThread := TWorkerThread.Create(Self.Handle, WM_MyProgress, HeavyWork);
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.btnPauseResumeClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if Assigned(MyThread) then
    MyThread.Paused := not MyThread.Paused;
end;

procedure TForm1.btnCancelTaskClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if Assigned(MyThread) then
  begin
    FreeAndNil(MyThread);
    btnStartTask.Enabled := true;
    btnPauseResume.Enabled := false;
    btnCancelTask.Enabled := false;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.OnMyProgressMsg(var Msg: TMessage);
begin
  Msg.Msg := 1;
  case Msg.LParam of
    0:
      Label1.Caption := Format('%5.1f %%', [100.0 * Msg.WParam / cWorkLoopMax]);
    1:
      begin
        Label1.Caption := 'Task done';
        btnCancelTaskClick(Self);
      end;
    2:
      Label1.Caption := 'Task terminated';
  end;
end;

end.

And the form:

object Form1: TForm1
  Left = 0
  Top = 0
  Caption = 'Form1'
  ClientHeight = 163
  ClientWidth = 328
  Color = clBtnFace
  Font.Charset = DEFAULT_CHARSET
  Font.Color = clWindowText
  Font.Height = -13
  Font.Name = 'Tahoma'
  Font.Style = []
  OldCreateOrder = False
  PixelsPerInch = 120
  TextHeight = 16
  object Label1: TLabel
    Left = 79
    Top = 18
    Width = 51
    Height = 16
    Caption = 'Task idle'
  end
  object Label2: TLabel
    Left = 32
    Top = 18
    Width = 41
    Height = 16
    Caption = 'Status:'
  end
  object btnStartTask: TButton
    Left = 32
    Top = 40
    Width = 137
    Height = 25
    Caption = 'Start'
    TabOrder = 0
    OnClick = btnStartTaskClick
  end
  object btnPauseResume: TButton
    Left = 32
    Top = 71
    Width = 137
    Height = 25
    Caption = 'Pause/Resume'
    Enabled = False
    TabOrder = 1
    OnClick = btnPauseResumeClick
  end
  object btnCancelTask: TButton
    Left = 32
    Top = 102
    Width = 137
    Height = 25
    Caption = 'Cancel'
    Enabled = False
    TabOrder = 2
    OnClick = btnCancelTaskClick
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
This is actually not that great as example code. Your paused threads will still wake up several dozen times a second. And how will you synchronize thread shutdown and destruction of externally owned event objects? Simply signal them, wait a bit and hope for the best? You either need to use reference counting for shared objects or free the threads before the events are freed (i.e. not use FreeOnTerminate) to do this the proper way. –  mghie Jul 1 '12 at 3:49
1  
Much better, +1 from me. –  mghie Jul 1 '12 at 10:13
2  
@JonasWielicki, Suspend and Resume was never indented to be used by any other processes than a debugger. They are deprecated since Delphi-XE. See documentation. –  LU RD Jul 1 '12 at 11:26
1  
@LU RD: Indeed, I should probably have modified the constructor parameter to just be a HWND instead of a form reference; it would still have been possible to pass the form handle, but also to pass the handle of a helper window. –  mghie Jul 1 '12 at 11:57
1  
@Blobby, added an example how to pass a procedure for the heavy work. –  LU RD Jul 1 '12 at 13:48

You can also use higher level libraries for threading, like:

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If the sample code in the answer by LU RD is too complicated for your taste then maybe a Delphi implementation of the .net BackgroundWorker class is more to your liking.

Using this you can drop a component onto your form and add handlers for its various events (OnWork, OnWorkProgress, OnWorkFeedback and OnWorkComplete). The component will execute the OnWork event handler in the background, while executing the other event handlers from the GUI thread (taking care of the necessary context switches and synchronization). However, a thorough understanding of what you can and what you must not do from secondary threads is still necessary for writing code in the OnWork event handler.

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A useful introduction to multithreading was written by a guy called Martin Harvey, many years ago. His tutorial can be found at the Embarcadero CC site - it also looks like he has uploaded an example class which does the kind of thing you are looking for, but I haven't looked at it so cannot say for sure.

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