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I am writing a C program in which I need to flush my memory. I would like know if there is any UNIX system command to flush memory cache. Also, it is a requirement for my project which involves calculating the time taken for my logic, therefore I need to flush the cache. Can someone help? Also I am new to the question's topic and the forum...so please excuse?

I need to flush the CPU cache.

I have read about the cacheflush(char *s, int a, int b) function but I am not sure as to whether it will be suitable and what to pass in the parameters.

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Why do you need to flush the cache? – Oliver Charlesworth Jun 30 '12 at 21:55
    
it is a requirement for my project which involves calculating the time taken for my logic, therefore I need to flush the cache. – Rose BEck Jun 30 '12 at 21:57
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1756825/cpu-cache-flush – Tudor Jun 30 '12 at 21:57
    
Q: Exactly what do you mean by "memory cache": tldp.org/LDP/tlk/mm/memory.html – paulsm4 Jun 30 '12 at 21:58
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This is really weird. I think there have now been at least 3 questions very similar to this in the last 24 hours. Given that this is a really odd question to begin with, I'm wondering if someone (perhaps a teacher/professor) put students up to this strange assignment? Is this homework? – phonetagger Jun 30 '12 at 22:05
  1. I take it you mean "CPU cache", not memory cache

  2. The link above is good: the suggestion "write a lot of data via CPU" is not Windows specific

  3. Here's another variation on the same theme:

  4. Here's an article about Linux and CPU cache:

NOTE:

At this (very, very low) level, "Linux" != "Unix"

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Thanks for being helpful. Its really a good community with helpful people...can u please explain how should i use echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches in my C program with a small example code. – Rose BEck Jun 30 '12 at 22:13
    
One of the beauty parts of nix (Unix in general and Linux specifically) is that you can treat "everything like a file". Specifically: fopen ("/proc/sys/vm/drop_caches", "w"); fprintf (fp, "3"); fclose (fp);. PS: If this *is homework, please use the "homework" tag in your questions. – paulsm4 Jun 30 '12 at 22:17
    
I am using fopen("proc/sys/vm.drop_caches", "w")....but how do i verify that my cache has indeed been cleared. @paulsm4 Thanks for being kind and helping earlier. Hope you'll help this time also. :) – Rose BEck Jul 1 '12 at 16:25

OK, sorry about my first answer. I later read your follow-up comments below your question, so I realize now that you want to flush the INSTRUCTION CACHE to boot your program (or parts of it) out of the cache, so that when you test its performance, you also test its initial load time out of main memory into the instruction cache. Do you also need to flush any data your code will use out to main memory, so that both data and code are fresh loads?

Before anything else, I'd like to mention that main memory itself is also a form of cache, with your hard disk (either the program on disk, or swap space on disk) being the lowest, slowest place your program's instructions could be coming from. That said, when you first run through a routine for the first time, if it hasn't already been loaded into main memory from disk by virtue of being near other code that has already executed, then its CPU instructions will first have to be loaded from disk. That takes an order of magnitude or more longer than loading it from main memory into the cache. Then once it's loaded into main memory, it takes somewhere along the lines of an order of magnitude longer to load from main memory into the cache than it takes to load from the cache into the CPU's instruction fetcher. So if you want to test your code's cold-start performance, you have to decide what cold-start means.... pulling it out of disk, or pulling it out of main memory. I don't know of any command to "flush" instructions/data out of main memory out to swap space, so flushing it out to main memory is about as much as you can do (that I know of), but keep in mind that your test results may still differ from the first run (when it may be pulling it off disk) to subsequent runs, even if you do flush the instruction cache.

Now, how would one go about flushing the instruction cache to ensure that their own code is flushed out to main memory?

If I needed to do this (very odd thing to do in my opinion), I'd probably start by finding the length & approximate placement of my functions in memory. Since I'm using Linux, I'd issue the command "objdump -d {myprogram} > myprogram.dump.txt", then I'd open myprogram.dump.txt in an editor and search for the functions I want to flush out, and figure out how long they are by subtracting their end address form their start address using a hex calculator. I'd write down the sizes of each. Later I'd add cacheflush() calls in my code, giving it the address of each function I want to flush out as 'addr' and the length I found as 'nbytes', and ICACHE. Just for safety I'd probably fudge a little & add about 10% to the size, just in case I make a few tweaks to the code and forget to adjust the nbytes. I'd make a call to cacheflush() like this for each function I want to flush out. Then if I need to flush out the data also, if it's using global/static data, I can flush those also (DCACHE), but if it's stack or heap data, there's really nothing realistic that I can (or should) do to flush that out of cache. Trying to do so would be an exercise in silliness, because it would be creating a condition that would never or very rarely exist in normal execution. Assuming you're using Linux...

#include <asm/cachectl.h>

int cacheflush(char *addr, int nbytes, int cache);

...where cache is one of:
   ICACHE Flush the instruction cache.
   DCACHE Write back to memory and invalidate the affected valid cache lines.
   BCACHE Same as (ICACHE|DCACHE).

BTW, is this homework for a class?

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Q: This is only applicable in kernel mode, correct? – paulsm4 Jun 30 '12 at 22:54
    
@paulsm4 - The Linux man page doesn't say anything about that. Hmmm. Reading on down the man page... (I'm assuming you're using Linux, right? If so, did you try the command "man cacheflush" ?) ... near the bottom, I see two things in my version of the man page that are cause for concern.... "BUGS - The current implementation ignores the addr and nbytes arguments. Therefore, the whole cache is always flushed." And further down... "NOTE - This system call is only available on MIPS based systems. It should not be used in programs intended to be portable." – phonetagger Jun 30 '12 at 23:18
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@paulsm4 error: asm/cachectl.h: No such file or directory the gnu-gcc compiler on linux throws this error. Any idea how to solve it...such that it accepts cachectl.h as a header file. – Rose BEck Jul 1 '12 at 16:29

If you're writing a user-mode (not kernel-mode) program, and if it's single-threaded, then there's really no reason for you to ever bother flushing your cache in the first place. Your user-mode program can just forget that it even exists; it's just there to speed up your program's execution, and the OS manages it via the processor's MMU.

There are only a couple reasons I can think of that you might actually want to flush the cache from your user-mode application:

  1. Your app is intended to run on a symmetric multiprocessor system, or has data transactions with external hardware)
  2. You're simply testing your cache for some sort of performance test (in which case you should probably really should be writing your test to operate in kernel mode, perhaps as a driver).

In any case, assuming you're using Linux...

#include <asm/cachectl.h>

int cacheflush(char *addr, int nbytes, int cache);

This assumes you have a block of memory you just wrote to and you want to make sure it's flushed out of the cache back to main memory. The block begins at addr, and it's nbytes long, and it's in one of the two caches (or both):

   ICACHE Flush the instruction cache.
   DCACHE Write back to memory and invalidate the affected valid cache lines.
   BCACHE Same as (ICACHE|DCACHE).

Normally you'd only need to flush the DCACHE, since when you write data to "memory" (i.e. to the cache), it's normally data, not instructions.

If you want to flush "all of the cache" for some strange testing reason, you could malloc() a big block that you know is larger than your CPU's cache (shoot, make it 8 times as big!), write any old garbage into it, and just flush that entire block.

See also: How to perform cache operations in C++?

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Thanks for being so helpful. How may I know the size of my CPU cache in ubuntu/unix/linux..as I want to flush out the entire cache – Rose BEck Jun 30 '12 at 22:40
    
See superuser.com/questions/48505/… See also my 2nd answer which I think is probably more along the lines of what you're looking for... I'd say "more along the lines of what you need" except I think your goal of flushing the cache for performance testing is misguided. What I think would make more sense for performance testing would be to test your code's performance AFTER it's loaded into the cache, by running it once to get it INTO the cache, then using a timer to test it maybe 10,000 times & dividing the time by 10,000. – phonetagger Jun 30 '12 at 23:00
    
error: asm/cachectl.h: No such file or directory the gnu-gcc compiler on linux throws this error. Any idea how to solve it...such that it accepts cachectl.h as a header file. – Rose BEck Jul 1 '12 at 16:28

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