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Just getting into the NoSQL stuff so forgive me if this is a simple question. I am trying to somewhat implement a repository type pattern using a generic repository for the more common operations.

One thing that I have run into that is killing this idea is that in order to get the collection you plan to work with you have to pass a string value for the name of the collection.

var collection = database.GetCollection<Entity>("entities");

This means that I have to hard code my collection names or code up a dictionary somewhere to act as a lookup so that i can map the object type to a collection name.

How is everyone else handling this?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you can do is "semi-hardcode." You can put the name of the collection in a class name and refere to it:

public class Entity {
  public static readonly string Name = "entities";
}

var collection = database.GetCollection<Entity>(Entity.Name);
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great idea, I thought about doing that and i can hide that property from MongoDB so that it's not saved in the DB... thanks. –  JBeckton Jul 1 '12 at 15:07
    
I've used a similar approach before. I've also seen people use typeof(T).FullName as the collection name. –  JefClaes Jul 2 '12 at 12:01
    
That's a good approach, but could potentially be dangerous if the namespaces get changed. –  Steven Luu Jul 2 '12 at 13:37
    
@JBeckton, you shouldn't have to hide it from Mongo. It's a static field, not an instance field. –  Steven Luu Jul 2 '12 at 13:38
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I wrote a class to manage DB transactions

First you need a base class for all entities:

public abstract class Entity
{
    public ObjectId Id { set; get; }
}

then an static class to manage all:

public static class MongoDB
{
    private static string connectionString = "mongodb://localhost";
    public static string DatabaseName { get { return "test"; } }

    private static MongoServer _server;
    private static MongoDatabase _database;

    public static MongoServer Server
    {
        get
        {
            if (_server == null)
            {
                var client = new MongoClient(connectionString);
                _server = client.GetServer();
            }

            return _server;
        }
    }

    public static MongoDatabase DB
    {
        get
        {
            if(_database == null)
                _database = Server.GetDatabase(MongoDB.DatabaseName);

            return _database;
        }
    }

    public static MongoCollection<T> GetCollection<T>() where T : Entity
    {
        return DB.GetCollection<T>(typeof(T).FullName);
    }

    public static List<T> GetEntityList<T>() where T : Entity
    {
        var collection = MongoDB.DB.GetCollection<T>(typeof(T).FullName);
        return collection.FindAll().ToList<T>();
    }

    public static void InsertEntity<T>(T entity) where T : Entity
    {
        GetCollection<T>().Save(entity);
    }
}

then use it like this:

 public class SomeEntity : Entity { public string Name {set;get;} }

 MongoDB.InsertEntity<SomeEntity>(new SomeEntity(){ Name = "ashkan" });

 List<SomeEntity> someEntities = MongoDB.GetEntityList<SomeEntity>();
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This is a great solution. I've implemented something similar but mine also plays well with Dependency Injection. I have a wrapper class for each database (PrimaryMongoDb, StatsMongoDb) and then I register an instance of each with the DI container. So any class asking for PrimaryMongoDb gets a single instance and then can get any collection like this instanceOfPrimaryDb.GetCollection<SomeType>(); Also, rather than an abstract class you can use an interface; I use IAggregateRoot which simply has an Id. –  kingdango Mar 29 at 15:13
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