Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been running into some problems concerning a SqlTransaction I'm using in my code. During my Googling I see many people using a using statement with a SqlTransaction.

What is the benefit and/or difference of using this type of statement with a SqlTransaction?

using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection())
{
     using (SqlTransaction tr = cn.BeginTransaction())
     {
      //some code
      tr.Commit();
     }
}

Currently my code looks like this:

SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["T3"]);
cn.Open();
SqlTransaction tr = cn.BeginTransaction();

try
{
     //some code
     tr.Commit();
     cn.Close();
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
      tr.Rollback();
      cn.Close();
      throw ex;
}

What is the advantage of one way over the other?

share|improve this question
4  
For "less" nesting, I believe you can skip the first pair of curly brackets. (or is it braces...) –  Svish Jul 14 '09 at 20:38

9 Answers 9

up vote 34 down vote accepted

A using statement should be used every time you create an instance of a class that implements IDisposable within the scope of a block. It ensures that the Dispose() method will be called on that instance, whether or not an exception is thrown.

In particular, your code only catches managed exceptions, then destroys the stack frame by throwing a new exception instead of rethrowing the existing one.

The correct way to do it is:

using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["T3"])) {
    cn.Open();
    using (SqlTransaction tr = cn.BeginTransaction()) {
        //some code
        tr.Commit();
    }
}

Note that if your class has instance members of types that implement IDisposable, then your class must implement IDisposable itself, and dispose of those members during its own Dispose() call.

share|improve this answer
1  
....because it guarantees that the "Dispose" method of the IDisposble interface being implemented will be called - no matter what happens in your code. –  marc_s Jul 14 '09 at 20:31
    
+1, generally correct, but you can't always use a using statement, sometimes you need to implement IDisposable yourself. I would say: "Whenever possible", which means "whenever creating an IDisposable instance used only within a bloc" or something like this. –  Stefan Steinegger Jul 14 '09 at 20:33
    
Yeah, yeah. :-) –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 20:34
1  
Yes, if Dispose is called on the SqlTransaction before a Commit, then the transaction will be rolled back. Of course, Dispose will be called if an exception is thrown within the block and not handled. –  John Saunders Aug 19 '11 at 19:32
4  
Do we have to explicitly declare tran.rollBack() inside a catch or will this be handled by the using block? –  Damien Joe Jun 11 '12 at 7:45

The reason for this is that the SqlTransaction object will roll back in its Dispose() method if it was not explicitly committed (e.g. if an exception is thrown). In other words, it has the same effect as your code, just a little bit cleaner.

share|improve this answer
2  
Confirmed this by de-compiling. Calls this.Rollback() on this.Dispose(). –  ddotsenko Sep 1 '11 at 19:11
2  
Actually, whether or not Rollback is called inside Dispose() dependent on the implementation of the driver you're using (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bf2cw321(v=vs.110).aspx). Driver implementors are supposed to call Rollback, but Microsoft recommends not counting on it. So if you know the only driver you'll ever use does call Rollback inside Dispose() you're safe. Otherwise, it's safer to explicitly call it. –  user1334007 Aug 20 at 20:00

Essentially the using does the same thing that you are doing, except int a finally block instead of catching all exceptions:

using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection())
{
     using (SqlTransaction tr = cn.BeginTransaction())
     {
      //some code
      tr.Commit();
     }
}

is the same as, just much less code :)

{
    SqlConnection cn = null;
    try
    {
       cn = new SqlConnection();
       {
           SqlTransaction tr = null;
           try
           {
               tr = cn.BeginTransaction())

               //some code
               tr.Commit();
            }
            finally
            {
                if(tr != null && tr is IDisposable)
                {
                    tr.Dispose();
                }
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if(cn != null && cn is IDisposable)
        {
            cn.Dispose();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You actually have an extra set of braces in your first example: you can nest using statements without creating a new block, e.g. using (x = new X) using (y = new Y) { } –  Robert Rossney Jul 15 '09 at 1:03
2  
Just being explicit, same reason we always put braces around all our if statements, even if they're one-liners –  heavyd Jul 15 '09 at 2:07

In the end, using is just a shortcut for a pattern. But it's a very useful and helpful shortcut, because it makes sure you implement the pattern correctly and means you can do it with less code.

In this case, you haven't implemented the pattern correctly. What happens in your code if the call to tr.RollBack() also throws an exception?

share|improve this answer

The using statement is closing and disposing your connection and transaction for you. It's the equivalent of having a finally block on your try/catch that does the dispose.

You could also condense the using blocks down a bit like this...

using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection())
using (SqlTransaction tr = cn.BeginTransaction())     
{
      //some code
      tr.Commit();
}

which would be roughly the same as:

SqlConnection cn = null;
SqlTransaction tr = null;
try
{
    cn = new SqlConnection());
    tr = cn.BeginTransaction());

    //some code
    tr.Commit();
}
finally
{
    if (cn != null)
        cn.Dispose();
    if (tr != null)    
        tr.Dispose();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very close, but there's also an additional anonymous scope block in there. The code as you have it won't compile, because cn and tr are out of scope in the finally block. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 14 '09 at 20:36
    
ahh, right - good catch. i'll update the example. –  Scott Ivey Jul 14 '09 at 20:38
    
What about rollback? –  Damien Joe Jun 11 '12 at 7:43

If you don't use a using() block, you'll have to explicitly call the .Dispose() method of the SqlConnection and SqlTransaction objects. If you fail to do that, then unmanaged resources will not be released and could cause memory leaks or other problems.

share|improve this answer
1  
Would not cause memory leaks, but it might cause resource leaks. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 14 '09 at 20:32
    
... which will efff you worse and faster. –  Andrei Rînea May 16 '11 at 11:58

Using using gurantees that your connection object will be disposed after the code returns. Dispose is useful to release unmanages resources, As a good practice, if an object implements IDisposable, dispose method always should be called

share|improve this answer
    
Connection - and the SqlTransaction object. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 20:47

In addition to all that, it prettifies your code. Doesn't the 7 lines of code look better than the 14 lines? I breath a sign of relief every time I see a using block. It's like that little squirt of mist that comes out of that glad smelly thing. Mmm, I'm a pretty block of efficient code. Look at how well I manage memory and how pleasing I am to the eye.

share|improve this answer

The Using statement is shorthand for properly handling a resource. You can find more information at MSDN article on Using statement

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.