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I am trying to write a function that takes two containers of the same contained type, e.g., two std::vector<int>s, or a std::list<int> and a std::vector<int>. (But not a std::vector<int> and a std::vector<double>!)

Since I am not quite sure regarding how it should be done, I decided to write a test progam first:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <algorithm>

struct vector_wrapper
{
  template <typename T>
  struct instance_wrapper
  {
    typedef typename std::vector<T> instance;
  };
};

struct list_wrapper
{
  template <typename T>
  struct instance_wrapper
  {
    typedef typename std::list<T> instance;
  };
};

template <typename T, typename C1, typename C2>
void move(typename C1::instance_wrapper<T>::instance& c1, typename C2::instance_wrapper<T>::instance& c2) // line 29
{
  while (c1.size() > 0)
  {
    c2.push_front(c1.back());
    c1.pop_back();
  }
}

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> v;
  std::list  <int> l;

  v.reserve(10);
  for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    v.push_back(i);

  move<int, vector_wrapper, list_wrapper>(v, l);

  std::for_each(l.begin(), l.end(),
    [] (int i) { std::cout << i << " "; }
  );

  std::cout << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

This code gives me the following compile-time error with g++ 4.7, using the -std=c++11 flag:

metaclass.cpp:29:24: error: non-template 'instance_wrapper' used as template
... more ...

Why does the compiler not correctly identify instance_wrapper as a template?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Compiler has already told you what is wrong (errors from ideone):

prog.cpp:25:24: error: non-template 'instance_wrapper' used as template
prog.cpp:25:24: note: use 'C1::template instance_wrapper' to indicate that it is a template

Use C1::template instance_wrapper instead of C1::instance_wrapper - and, similarly, do the same for C2::instance_wrapper:

template <typename T, typename C1, typename C2>
void move(typename C1::template instance_wrapper<T>::instance& c1, 
    typename C2::template instance_wrapper<T>::instance& c2)
{
    // ...

It's because C1 is template and compiler cannot deduce that instance_wrapper is template and treats it as non-template type.

Please, please, read everything compiler outputs. Not just line-by-line. Often compiler says what's wrong in one of previous or following lines, as in this case, when it's already giving you the answer!

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I never ever knew about having to insert template in the middle of that. I guess everyday you learn something! :) –  Eduardo León Jun 30 '12 at 23:26
5  
@EduardoLeón, you would have known if you've read the error message... –  Griwes Jun 30 '12 at 23:27
    
Oh, you are right. –  Eduardo León Jun 30 '12 at 23:29
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Here's a better solution that doesn't require any weird wrappers that disable argument deduction and have the client specify them, just clean and simple SFINAE that works in C++03:

#include <type_traits> // or Boost equivalent

// a little helper struct to keep the 
// function as clutter-free as possible
template<class C1, class C2, class T = void>
struct enable_if_same_value_type
  : std::enable_if<std::is_same<typename C1::value_type,
        typename C2::value_type>::value, T>
{
};

template<class C1, class C2>
typename enable_if_same_value_type<C1, C2>::type
move(C1& source, C2& target){
  /* ... */
}

Note that your code isn't quite generic, btw, since push_front is not supported by std::vector, so you're never able to pass two of them. Also, I wouldn't call the function move, since you're prepending the content of the first container on the second.

That said, there's a std::move overload in C++11 that takes three iterators and moves the content marked by the first too into the output iterator that is passed as the third parameter. As such, your main can be rewritten as follows:

#include <algorithm> // algorithmic move
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <iterator> // front_inserter
#include <iostream>

int main(){
  std::vector<int> v;
  std::list<int> l;

  v.reserve(10);
  for (unsigned i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    v.push_back(i);

  // I used 'rbegin'  and 'rend' so the order stays the same
  std::move(v.rbegin(), v.rend(), std::front_inserter(l));

  std::copy(l.begin(), l.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}

Live example on Ideone.

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You don't need the extra struct, you can do typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<typename C1::value_type, typename C2::value_type>::value>::type move(...) { ... } –  Seth Carnegie Jun 30 '12 at 23:47
    
@Seth: The struct is just there for a cleaner look. Moved the SFINAE to the return type, though. –  Xeo Jun 30 '12 at 23:49
    
Regarding enable_if: this kind of weirdness is precisely what pushed (and, to be honest, continues to push me) towards Haskell. Also, my move function was not meant to be a std::move overload, I simply chose the function's name in an unwise manner. –  Eduardo León Jul 1 '12 at 1:13
    
@Eduardo: I was only talking about the naming, nothing in relation to std::move. I was talking about a std::move overload, because there's the iterator one int <algorithm>, and the move semantics one in <utility>. –  Xeo Jul 1 '12 at 1:31
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For future reference, you can do this more simply:

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T, typename A1, typename A2, template <typename, typename> class Cont1, template<typename, typename> class Cont2>
void move(Cont1<T, A1>& from, Cont2<T, A2>& to) {
    while (!from.empty()) { // use !empty(), not size()
        to.push_front(from.back());
        from.pop_back();
    }
}

std::vector<int> v;
std::list<int> l;

move(v, l); // and no need to specify types
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2  
std::queue, std::stack and std::(unordered_)(multi){map, set} would like a word with you. :P –  Xeo Jun 30 '12 at 23:46
    
@Xeo meh, no one cares about them. –  Seth Carnegie Jun 30 '12 at 23:46
    
Aswell as all the user-defined containers that don't just have two template parameter *looking over to Boost*. –  Xeo Jun 30 '12 at 23:48
    
@Xeo yeah, your way is better for that reason (and others). –  Seth Carnegie Jun 30 '12 at 23:48
    
I found this out, like, 15 minutes after accepting the first answer. Actually, for this to work elegantly, this needs a couple of typedef templates: ideone.com/WWViC . Also, this answer needs more upvotes. –  Eduardo León Jul 1 '12 at 1:07
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