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I am trying to read a file and then display the file in ASCII or HEX into hEdit. Eventually I will be running other computations on the file info but right now I just want to see it all.

Currently the code displays the first bit - "MZ" - but thats it. Somehow I am accidentally truncating the pszFileText variable, I want to be able to view the entire executable in my window.

BOOL ReadInEXEFile(HWND hEdit, LPCTSTR pszFileName)
{
HANDLE hFile;
BOOL bSuccess = FALSE;

hFile = CreateFile(pszFileName, GENERIC_READ, FILE_SHARE_READ, NULL,
    OPEN_EXISTING, 0, NULL);
if(hFile != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
    DWORD dwFileSize;

    dwFileSize = GetFileSize(hFile, NULL);
    if(dwFileSize != 0xFFFFFFFF)
    {
        LPSTR pszFileText;

        pszFileText = GlobalAlloc(GPTR, dwFileSize + 1);
        if(pszFileText != NULL)
        {
            DWORD dwRead;
            if(ReadFile(hFile, pszFileText, dwFileSize, &dwRead, NULL))
            {
                pszFileText[dwFileSize] = 0; // Add null terminator
                if(SetWindowText(hEdit, pszFileText))
                {
                    bSuccess = TRUE; // It worked!
                }
            }
            GlobalFree(pszFileText);
        }
    }
    CloseHandle(hFile);
}
return bSuccess;

}

share|improve this question
1  
You are passing the file content to the edit control as a zero-terminated string. Meaning that if there's a zero somewhere in the middle of the file, it will get terminated right there. So, apparently our file has a zero right after the "MZ". This is basically what you should expect when you to interpret binary files as zero-terminated strings. –  AndreyT Jul 1 '12 at 0:32
    
In any case, why are you trying to test your code on a binary file??? It was obviously intended for text files only. –  AndreyT Jul 1 '12 at 0:33
    
I want to be able to analyze executables. This is how I found how read files within a win32 gui so this is what I am trying to augment to be able to use for exe's. –  joe norton Jul 1 '12 at 0:38
    
Well, you won't be able to "analyze executables" by trying to look at them as text in an edit control. –  AndreyT Jul 1 '12 at 0:42
1  
You do not need to DISPLAY the data in order to ANALYZE it. Those are two separate operations. You can ANALYZE the original binary data as-is directly in your code, but you will have to encode the data if you want to DISPLAY it. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 1 '12 at 1:27
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

EXE files are binary, but you are you trying to display the raw binary data as-is, which will not work. You were on the right track thinking that you need to encode the binary data to hex before displaying it. Binary data is not displayable, but hex is.

Try this instead:

static const TCHAR Hex[] = TEXT("0123456789ABCDEF");

BOOL ReadInEXEFile(HWND hEdit, LPCTSTR pszFileName) 
{ 
    BOOL bSuccess = FALSE; 

    HANDLE hFile = CreateFile(pszFileName, GENERIC_READ, FILE_SHARE_READ, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, 0, NULL); 
    if (hFile != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) 
    { 
        DWORD dwFileSize = GetFileSize(hFile, NULL); 
        if (dwFileSize != INVALID_FILE_SIZE)
        { 
            LPTSTR pszFileText = (LPTSTR) LocalAlloc(LMEM_FIXED, ((dwFileSize * 3) + 1) * sizeof(TCHAR)); 
            if (pszFileText != NULL)
            {
                BYTE buffer[1024];
                DWORD dwOffset = 0;
                DWORD dwRead; 

                for (DWORD dwFilePos = 0; dwFilePos < dwFileSize; dwFilePos += dwRead)
                {
                    if (!ReadFile(hFile, buffer, sizeof(buffer), &dwRead, NULL)) 
                    {
                        CloseHandle(hFile);
                        return FALSE;
                    }

                    if (dwRead == 0)
                        break;

                    for (DWORD idx = 0; idx < dwRead; ++idx)
                    {
                        pszFileText[dwOffset++] = Hex[(buffer[idx] & 0xF0) >> 4];
                        pszFileText[dwOffset++] = Hex[buffer[idx] & 0x0F];
                        pszFileText[dwOffset++] = TEXT(' ');
                    }
                }

                pszFileText[dwOffset] = 0; // Add null terminator 

                bSuccess = SetWindowText(hEdit, pszFileText);
                LocalFree(pszFileText);
            } 
        } 

        CloseHandle(hFile); 
    } 

    return bSuccess; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Remy I really appreciate your help. I will look into this. –  joe norton Jul 1 '12 at 0:43
    
I appreciate your help! Unfortunately, visual studio is giving me errors because of declaring types in the for statement. Eventually I'll figure out what way it wants this formatted and be able to give it a shot. I'll figure it out and let you know. –  joe norton Jul 1 '12 at 1:29
    
If Visual Studio does not like this code then it is being dumb because the code is perfectly valid as-is. It is legal to declare variables inside of for statements. Microsoft's own documentation shows examples of that. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 1 '12 at 2:31
    
Indeed. I did tiny changes and it now works. Great job, thanks for your help. Now I am working on how to convert it into ASCII & Unicode! –  joe norton Jul 1 '12 at 2:57
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Two reasons:

1) If you are reading an executable, the third byte is likely to be a zero, which might terminate the string, even though you are passing the length to SetWindowText.

2) This line is wrong: pszFileText[dwFileSize + 1] = 0;. It should be pszFileText[dwFileSize] = 0;. You are writing a zero byte some place wrong, there's no telling what that might be doing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for #2, fixed now. But still same issue. How might I try to print the variable without it getting prematurely terminated? –  joe norton Jul 1 '12 at 0:35
add comment

The way you are displaying it probably depends on the data being a NUL-terminated string, and binary data has embedded NULs in it, so you only display the data up to the first NUL.

You will need to print it by yourself and use the length of the data to know how much to print instead of depending on it being a NUL-terminated C-string.

share|improve this answer
    
I concur. The first 4 bytes of all .exe files are 0x4D 0x5A 0x90 0x00, where 0x4D 0x5A is the ASCII sequence MZ and 0x90 is not a visual character. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 1 '12 at 0:34
    
Informative, but how? –  joe norton Jul 1 '12 at 0:36
    
@joenorton with a loop; loop from 0 to the number of bytes you read and print each byte. –  Seth Carnegie Jul 1 '12 at 0:56
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