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I'm not entirely too familiar with prototypes, and I'm sure this is the incorrect implementation but I've put together a tiny example of what I'm trying to achieve.

I could make the prototype a literal object instead of a function but than I ran into issues where I cannot access the variables/properties inside the Object I'm creating a prototype of (in this case Person).

Person = function() {
  this.name = 'mike';
  this.departureSaying = 'Adios amigo!';
}

Person.prototype.say = function() {
  var self = this;
  function hello() { alert('hello my name is ' + self.name); }
  function goodbye() { alert(self.departureSaying); }
}

var mike = new Person();
mike.say.hello();
mike.say.goodbye();

If you run this you'll get Object has no method hello and goodbye.

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your two functions are local to the method; you're not returning them.

Person.prototype.say = function() {
    var self = this;

    return {
        hello: function() { alert('hello my name is ' + self.name); },
        goodbye: function() { alert(self.departureSaying); }
    };
};

And then you'll want:

mike.say().hello();
mike.say().goodbye();

However, I don't believe using the prototype is right for this situation. Assign it in the constructor, instead:

function Person() {
    var self = this;

    this.name = 'mike';
    this.departureSaying = 'Adios amigo!';

    this.say = {
        hello: function() { alert('hello my name is ' + self.name); },
        goodbye: function() { alert(self.departureSaying); }
    };
}

Here's a demo.

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