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I read of a useful trick about how you can avoid using the wrong domain data in your code by creating a data type for each domain type you're using. By doing this the compiler will prevent you from accidentally mixing your types.

For example, defining these:

public struct Meter
{
    public int Value;

    public Meter(int value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }
}

public struct Second
{
    public int Value;

    public Second(int value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }
}

allows me to not mix up meters and seconds because they're separate data types. This is great and I can see how useful it can be. I'm aware you'd still need to define operator overloads to handle any kind of arithmetic with these types, but I'm leaving that out for simplicity.

The problem I'm having with this approach is that in order to use these types I need to use the full constructor every time, like this:

Meter distance = new Meter(5);

Is there any way in C# I can use the same mode of construction that a System.Int32 uses, like this:

Meter distance = 5;

I tried creating an implicit conversion but it seems this would need to be part of the Int32 type, not my custom types. I can't add an Extension Method to Int32 because it would need to be static, so is there any way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean you can't add an extension method to Int32 because it would be static? (the whole point of extension methods is that they operate as though they are instance methods, which is perfectly applicable to primitives such as ints.) –  Kirk Woll Jul 1 '12 at 0:58
    
I thought I needed to add the implicit operator converstion as a static method to Int32 but you can't add static methods to existing types (only instance methods.) Anyway, Kendal Frey got the right answer I was looking for. –  Nick Gotch Jul 1 '12 at 1:01
    
I agree that's the answer you were looking for. But I still don't understand what you mean by "static methods". Extension methods for all intents and purposes act like instance methods. So, for the sake of discussion, Meter distance = 5.ToMeter(); would have worked just fine. (though I agree it's not as concise as implicit conversions) –  Kirk Woll Jul 1 '12 at 1:03
1  
@Kirk: Extension methods behave as instance methods, but conversion operators must be static. This is why extension methods don't work. –  Kendall Frey Jul 1 '12 at 1:04
    
@KendallFrey, yes, of course extension methods are not the same as implicit conversions. In fact, the concept of using extension methods to achieve the exact same syntax as implicit conversions is silly. But the fact remains that you can use extension methods to accomplish a similar goal. –  Kirk Woll Jul 1 '12 at 1:05
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1 Answer

up vote 24 down vote accepted

You can specify an implicit conversion directly in the structs themselves.

public struct Meter
{
    public int Value;

    public Meter(int value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }

    public static implicit operator Meter(int a)
    {
         return new Meter(a);
    }
}

public struct Second
{
    public int Value;

    public Second(int value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }

    public static implicit operator Second(int a)
    {
         return new Second(a);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! I tried an implicit operator as int(Meter m), don't know why I didn't try it the other way around. Wow. Thanks! –  Nick Gotch Jul 1 '12 at 0:59
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