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I am doing the classic split-apply-recombine thing in R. My data set is a bunch of firms over time. The applying I am doing is running a regression for each firm and returning the residuals, therefore, I am not aggregating by firm. plyr is great for this but it takes a very very long time to run when the number of firms is large. Is there a way to do this with data.table?

Sample Data:

dte, id, val1, val2
2001-10-02, 1, 10, 25
2001-10-03, 1, 11, 24
2001-10-04, 1, 12, 23
2001-10-02, 2, 13, 22
2001-10-03, 2, 14, 21

I need to split by each id (namely 1 and 2). Run a regression, return the residuals and append it as a column to my data. Is there a way to do this using data.table?

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Are you sure the time suck is in the looping and not the regressions? –  blindJesse Jul 1 '12 at 3:22
    
I'm sure it is possible. How far have you gotten so far in implementing a data.table solution? –  joran Jul 1 '12 at 3:30
    
@blindJesse, unfortunately it is. i have not started implementing a solution. I wanted to see first if there was something that was standard. –  Alex Jul 1 '12 at 4:46
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'm guessing this needs to be sorted by "id" to line up properly. Luckily that happens automatically when you set the key:

dat <-read.table(text="dte, id, val1, val2
 2001-10-02, 1, 10, 25
 2001-10-03, 1, 11, 24
 2001-10-04, 1, 12, 23
 2001-10-02, 2, 13, 22
 2001-10-03, 2, 14, 21
 ", header=TRUE, sep=",")
 dtb <- data.table(dat)
 setkey(dtb, "id")
 dtb[, residuals(lm(val1 ~ val2)), by="id"]
#---------------
cbind(dtb, dtb[, residuals(lm(val1 ~ val2)), by="id"])
#---------------
            dte id val1 val2 id.1            V1
[1,] 2001-10-02  1   10   25    1  1.631688e-15
[2,] 2001-10-03  1   11   24    1 -3.263376e-15
[3,] 2001-10-04  1   12   23    1  1.631688e-15
[4,] 2001-10-02  2   13   22    2  0.000000e+00
[5,] 2001-10-03  2   14   21    2  0.000000e+00



> dat <- data.frame(dte=Sys.Date()+1:1000000, 
                    id=sample(1:2, 1000000, repl=TRUE),  
                    val1=runif(1000000),  val2=runif(1000000) )
> dtb <- data.table(dat)
> setkey(dtb, "id")
> system.time(  cbind(dtb, dtb[, residuals(lm(val1 ~ val2)), by="id"]) )
   user  system elapsed 
  1.696   0.798   2.466 
> system.time( dtb[,transform(.SD,r = residuals(lm(val1~val2))),by = "id"] )
   user  system elapsed 
  1.757   0.908   2.690 

EDIT from Matthew : This is all correct for v1.8.0 on CRAN. With the small addition that transform in j is the subject of data.table wiki point 2: "For speed don't transform() by group, cbind() afterwards". But, := now works by group in v1.8.1 and is both simple and fast. See my answer for illustration (but no need to vote for it).

Well, I voted for it. Here is the console command to install v 1.8.1on a Mac (if you have the proper XCode tools avaialble, since it only there in source):

install.packages("data.table", repos= "http://R-Forge.R-project.org", type="source", 
               lib="/Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/2.14/Resources/lib")

(For some reason I could not get the Mac GUI Package Installer to read r-forge as a repository.)

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I'm curious, would there be a performance difference between this and dtb[,transform(.SD,r = residuals(lm(val1~val2))),by = "id"]? –  joran Jul 1 '12 at 3:36
    
Doesn't look like it. On 10,000 cases, they both take a tenth of a sec as elapsed. The run-to-run variation is bigger than the differences with 100,000 cases. (around .3 sec) . I'll post the 1MM record case. –  BondedDust Jul 1 '12 at 3:49
    
Interesting, thanks! –  joran Jul 1 '12 at 3:59
    
excellent, thank you! –  Alex Jul 1 '12 at 4:50
    
@DWin, i did have a followup question that is somewhat unrelated: how does the setkey() function work in terms of being able to modify dtb without actually doing any assignment? I thought that once you pass something to a function and try to modify, a local copy gets created. –  Alex Jul 1 '12 at 5:01
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DWin's answer is correct for v1.8.0 (as currently on CRAN). But in v1.8.1 (on R-Forge repository), := now works by group. It works for non-contiguous groups too so there is no need to setkey first for it to line up.

dtb <- as.data.table(dat)
dtb
           dte id val1 val2
1:  2001-10-02  1   10   25
2:  2001-10-03  1   11   24
3:  2001-10-04  1   12   23
4:  2001-10-02  2   13   22
5:  2001-10-03  2   14   21
dtb[, resid:=residuals(lm(val1 ~ val2)), by=id]
           dte id val1 val2         resid
1:  2001-10-02  1   10   25  1.631688e-15
2:  2001-10-03  1   11   24 -3.263376e-15
3:  2001-10-04  1   12   23  1.631688e-15
4:  2001-10-02  2   13   22  0.000000e+00
5:  2001-10-03  2   14   21  0.000000e+00

To upgrade to v1.8.1 just install from the R-Forge repo. (R 2.15.0+ is needed when installing any binary package from R-Forge) :

install.packages("data.table", repos="http://R-Forge.R-project.org")

or install from source if you can't upgrade to latest R. data.table itself only needs R 2.12.0+.

Extending to the 1MM case :

DT = data.table(dte=Sys.Date()+1:1000000, 
                id=sample(1:2, 1000000, repl=TRUE),
                val1=runif(1000000),  val2=runif(1000000) )
setkey(DT, id)
system.time(ans1 <- cbind(DT, DT[, residuals(lm(val1 ~ val2)), by="id"]) )
   user  system elapsed 
 12.272   0.872  13.182 
ans1
                dte id      val1       val2 id           V1
      1: 2012-07-02  1 0.8369147 0.57553383  1  0.336647598
      2: 2012-07-05  1 0.0109102 0.02532214  1 -0.488633325
      3: 2012-07-06  1 0.4977762 0.16607786  1 -0.001952414
     ---                                                   
 999998: 4750-05-27  2 0.1296722 0.62645838  2 -0.370627034
 999999: 4750-05-28  2 0.2686352 0.04890710  2 -0.231952238
1000000: 4750-05-29  2 0.9981029 0.91626787  2  0.497948275

system.time(DT[, resid:=residuals(lm(val1 ~ val2)), by=id])
   user  system elapsed 
  7.436   0.648   8.107 
DT
                dte id      val1       val2        resid
      1: 2012-07-02  1 0.8369147 0.57553383  0.336647598
      2: 2012-07-05  1 0.0109102 0.02532214 -0.488633325
      3: 2012-07-06  1 0.4977762 0.16607786 -0.001952414
     ---                                                
 999998: 4750-05-27  2 0.1296722 0.62645838 -0.370627034
 999999: 4750-05-28  2 0.2686352 0.04890710 -0.231952238
1000000: 4750-05-29  2 0.9981029 0.91626787  0.497948275

The example above only has 2 groups, is quite small at under 40MB, and Rprof shows 96% of the time is spent in lm. So in these cases := by group is not for a speed advantage really, but more for the convenience; i.e., less code needed to write and no superfluous columns added to the output. As size grows, the avoidance of copies comes into it and speed advantages start to show. Especially, transform in j will slow down terribly as the number of groups increases.

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Thanks. Matthew. I am putting a note at the end of my answer that has the console command to install the new version from r-forge on a Mac. –  BondedDust Jul 1 '12 at 18:18
    
@DWin Oh. I thought R-Forge builds a binary for Mac too and it was as simple as that. It has a build log for Mac here then click 'show/hide' button. You do have to be 2.15.0+ for R-Forge repo, though, I keep forgetting to mention that. –  Matt Dowle Jul 1 '12 at 18:26
    
@DWin which might also explain why Mac GUI Package Installer didn't recognise R-Forge (if it is 2.14), since the repo is 2.15+ only. –  Matt Dowle Jul 1 '12 at 18:34
    
That could be it... but I do have a successfully compiled version with R 2.14.2 now. Hasn't been tested in the heat of battle, though. –  BondedDust Jul 1 '12 at 18:35
3  
wow this data.table thing is just SOOO fast. pretty amazing. –  Alex Jul 1 '12 at 19:16
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