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I'm creating a program to open .txt files in a given directory, I have an array with all the absolute paths of the files inside the directory in question and I'm creating a function to extract and return the name of the files, the function is written as follows:

char *name(char *string) {
    int i = strlen(string);
    char *aux;
    while(string[i-1] != '/'){
        i--;
    }
    strcpy(aux, &string[i]); 
    return aux;
}

The above function is giving a Segmentation Fault error, but if I add the following line " int j = 0;" before the declaration of aux the mistake is gone, the new and working code is

char *name(char *string) {
    int i = strlen(string);
    int j = 0;
    char *aux;
    while(string[i-1] != '/'){
        i--;
    }
    strcpy(aux, &string[i]); 
    return aux;
}

input: C:\test\a.txt
output: a.txt

Why the addition of "int j = 0;" solves the problem? I'm stuck with that and can't continue because I don't know if this inconsistency might lead to bigger problems later, I'm thinking about writing my own function to copy the strings, but before that I really want to understand that error.

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1  
aux is uninitialized. Use malloc first. –  Steve Howard Jul 1 '12 at 4:05
    
another solution that I found is interchange the order of the declarations "int i = strlen(string);" and "char *aux;" –  user1493813 Jul 1 '12 at 4:06
1  
@user1493813, These aren't solutions. This is undefined behaviour. –  chris Jul 1 '12 at 4:11
    
Also, another side note, your input is specifying backslashes, and your loop is looking for forwardslashes. You don't have any loop terminator other than finding a forward slashes, so you should segfault on this input as well. To be safe, put in a check to bail on i == 0. –  Nick Jul 1 '12 at 4:14
2  
Props for "can't continue because i don't know if this inconsistency might lead to bigger problems later" and coming here to ask instead of just carrying on after finding something that "works". –  Daniel Fischer Jul 1 '12 at 4:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You never allocate aux. aux needs to point to a valid memory location before you attempt to copy anything to it.

Instead of char *aux, you need something like char *aux = malloc(i+1);. Note that i+1 is overkill because in your case aux will always be at least 3 characters shorter than string (it won't contain C:\), but you probably don't care for such small strings. Remember to free() the pointer once you're done with it.

Also, the reason you found it works by switching orders of declarations and/or adding a declaration is probably that you got lucky and somehow the location to which aux points to is valid (if you do just char *aux;, aux points to a random location). This is pure luck however, and is still invalid code even though it seems to work.

In the future, you might want to use a tool like Valgrind to help you diagnose memory problems. You should also read a tutorial on basic memory management and pointers in C.

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1  
strcpy copies the null terminator, you absolutely need (i+1). –  Nick Jul 1 '12 at 4:10
    
@Nick: no you don't. aux is always shorter than string. –  houbysoft Jul 1 '12 at 4:11
    
@Nick: added explanation to answer in case it wasn't obvious. –  houbysoft Jul 1 '12 at 4:13
    
Yeah I missed the part that he was always using absolute paths, thanks. –  Nick Jul 1 '12 at 4:16
    
@Nick: no problem :) –  houbysoft Jul 1 '12 at 4:17

Since it sounds like you are only interested in utilizing the filename portion of the string as parameter, another option is to use the portion of the string you already have.

Try: aux = &string[i]; instead of the strcpy.

This gives you a pointer into the part of the string you are interested in (namely, the last part after the final '/').

Secondly, ensure you have a '/' in all of your input strings, otherwise bad things will happen (i.e. your loop will go past the beginning of the string, likely encountering a segmentation fault at some point). It would be best to put a condition on the loop so that it doesn't continue beyond i = 1.

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You don't allocate any memory to aux. You are trying to write to memory through an uninitialized pointer.

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