Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to view the key/value pairs of a NSDictionary variable through the Xcode debugger? Here's the extent of information when it is fully expanded in the variable window:

Variable  Value      Summary
jsonDict  0x45c540   4 key/value pairs
 NSObject {...}
  isa     0xa06e0720

I was expecting it to show me each element of the dictionary (similar to an array variable).

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 115 down vote accepted

In the gdb window you can use po to inspect the object.

given:

NSMutableDictionary* dict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
[dict setObject:@"foo" forKey:@"bar"];
[dict setObject:@"fiz" forKey:@"buz"];

setting a breakpoint after the objects are added you can inspect what is in the dictionary

(gdb) po dict
{
  bar = foo;
  buz = fiz;
}

Of course these are NSString objects that print nicely. YMMV with other complex objects.

share|improve this answer
5  
Hi! What is gdb? What is po? Not sure to understand... Thanks for your help! :) –  Martin Jul 9 '09 at 14:08
1  
Ok so I found out that GDB stands for GNU debugger and is in fact the debugger window of Xcode. Now I need to find what is po –  Martin Jul 9 '09 at 14:11
15  
OK! So gdb is in fact a prompt in the Console, where you can input commands. By typing "po object_name" you got the object content printed in the console. –  Martin Jul 9 '09 at 14:13
2  
this is quite late, but you are a great, great man. –  Jason Prado Jun 24 '10 at 7:13
4  
po is an alias for print-object –  Brad Cupit Nov 16 '10 at 19:31

You can right-click any object (ObjC or Core Foundation) variable and select “Print Description to Console” (also in Run->Variables View). This prints the result the obejct’s -debugDescription method, which by default calls -description. Unfortunately, NSDictionary overrides this to produce a bunch of internal data the you generally don’t care about, so in this specific case craigb’s solution is better.

The displayed keys and values also use -description, so if you want useful information about your objects in collections and elsewhere, overriding -description is a must. I generally implement it along these lines, to match the format of the default NSObject implementation:

-(NSString *) description
{
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"<%@ %p>{foo: %@}", [self class], self, [self foo]];
}
share|improve this answer

You can use CFShow()

NSMutableDictionary* dict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
[dict setObject:@"foo" forKey:@"bar"];
[dict setObject:@"fiz" forKey:@"buz"];
CFShow(dict);

In output you will see

{
  bar = foo;
  buz = fiz;
}
share|improve this answer

You can also use NSLog.

Also you can go in Debug area or xcode, then find out All Variables, Registers, Globals and Statics then select your variable. Right click on it. Then select Print description of "...."

Hope it helps!

share|improve this answer

XCode 4.6 has added the following functionality which may be helpful to you

The elements of NSArray and NSDictionary objects can now be inspected in the Xcode debugger

Now you can inspect these object types without having to print the entire object in the console. Enjoy!

Source: http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/DeveloperTools/Conceptual/WhatsNewXcode/Articles/xcode_4_6.html

share|improve this answer
    
This is buggy for me -- only shows part of my NSDictionary –  Paul Slocum Feb 26 at 22:21

Click on your dict, then click on the little "i" icon, it should do the job :-) Xcode5, view the value of a dict

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.